Skip to content

Feeding the Birds

Yesterday morning I had a new experience---feeding baby birds. Carolina Wildlife Care center has been overwhelmed by 70 baby songbirds rescued from the limbs of trees trimmed without regard for the birds nesting there. Caring for so many nestlings has placed a tremendous burden on the regular staff and volunteers. The birds were housed in temporary cages constructed from cardboard boxes, netting, and electrical tape. There were several cages of finches and grackles, and one of bluebirds. There were wrens and a brown thrasher---and they were all hungry! Joanna Weitzel gave me a tour of the birds and basic instructions on feeding and cleaning the cages even as she continued feeding the nestlings herself. I began to replace the soiled papers that covered the floor of each box. Other volunteers were hand-feeding in a seemingly endless rotation.

Reaching into the boxes to pull the old papers was an interesting introduction to bird behavior at close quarters. Recently fed wrens huddled together quietly. Finches danced about the interior avoiding any chance contact with my hands. In another box, three very hungry grackle babies rushed the door and weren’t at all shy about perching on my hand as they tried to use it for an escape route out of the box. Their protest at my attention to their cage instead of their appetites was vociferous. While I managed to keep those noisy boys contained in their box, a quick little finch flew right past my hand before I had the door quite open. Luckily, Joanna is an experienced bird-catcher.

 


Ellen B. Says: Birds of the Carolinas
Amazon Says: The well-loved standard reference for bird-watchers and nature lovers in North Carolina and South Carolina, Birds of the Carolinas collects information on all avian species kn more...
Amazon Says: The well-loved standard reference for bird-watchers and nature lovers in North Carolina and South Carolina, Birds of the Carolinas collects information on all avian species known to have occurred in the region since 1900. This thoroughly revised second edition describes more than 460 individual species, including 60 new species that have been recorded since the publication of the first edition in 1980. Updated entries for all species reflect the current status of bird life as well as major changes in taxonomy and nomenclature. Each species account indicates when and where the bird is most likely to be found in the Carolinas, its nesting habits, feeding habits, and descriptive information useful in identifying the species. Generously illustrated with nearly 400 color photographs, this comprehensive guide to regional birds and their behavior will quickly earn a prominent place on the bookshelf of every bird-watcher in the Carolinas. less...
Amazon


Bluebirds Forever by Connie Toops
Ellen B. Says: Bluebirds Forever
Amazon Says: Few garden birds have contributed so much to the rising popularity of birds in general than members of the titmice family. Their boldness, attractiveness, and agility has ende more...
Amazon Says: Few garden birds have contributed so much to the rising popularity of birds in general than members of the titmice family. Their boldness, attractiveness, and agility has endeared them to countless armchair bird watchers. For nature and animal fans. less...
Amazon


Ellen B. Says: Care of the Wild Feathered & Furred: Treating and Feeding Injured Birds and Animals
Amazon Says: This is a book more...
Amazon Says: This is a book less...
Amazon


Ellen B. Says: Private Lives of Garden Birds
Amazon Says: Brimming with stories, wisdom, and expert knowledge, this delightful book gives enthusiasts a peek into the private worlds of eleven North American birds: swallows, blue jay more...
Amazon Says: Brimming with stories, wisdom, and expert knowledge, this delightful book gives enthusiasts a peek into the private worlds of eleven North American birds: swallows, blue jays, chickadees, song sparrows, house sparrows, phoebes, mockingbirds, crows, red-winged blackbirds, robins, and hummingbirds. Calvin Simonds shows you how to really observe these birds -- how to interpret the caws of crows, recognize blue jays from their facial markings, understand the flight patterns of swallows. You'll be enthralled as you eavesdrop on a group of sparrows trading songs in a "hootenanny," feel the dry grip of a chickadee's claws on your fingers, tramp through a summer meadow to visit a phoebe, and much more. less...
Amazon


South Carolina Bird Life by Alexander Sprunt Jr.
Ellen B. Says: South Carolina Bird Life
Amazon Says: The most wonderful book covering our feathered friends in South Carolina! more...
Amazon Says: The most wonderful book covering our feathered friends in South Carolina! less...
Amazon

Print

Comment about this page...