Skip to content
Cecil Williams
Photographer Cecil Williams

Civil Rights Photographer Comes to Richland Library

Have you noticed this picture at Richland Library Main of a cocky young man taking a drink? It hangs over the water fountain on the Garden level, and is a poignant reminder of how much has changed in fifty years. This young man is Cecil Williams, the photographer whose work currently lines the walls of The Gallery at Main as the exhibit Freedom and Justice: Cecil Williams Captures the Columbia Civil Rights Struggle.

Most photographers communicate their message only through the images they share, but on September 22, Cecil Williams and his mentor, John Goodwin, will come to Richland Library to talk about their experiences as black photographers in South Carolina during Jim Crow and the Civil Rights era. Join us on Sunday, September 22 at 3 p.m. to hear Williams and Goodwin speak about their work, photography and their part in the campaign for equality.


Diana K. Says: In exclusive and large format photography, Orangeburg native Cecil Williams chronicles the lives and accomplishments of the heroic people of this state who began and led the struggle for desegregation in America.
Amazon Says: The 1949 Briggs vs. Elliot case that originated in Clarendon County and the Orangeburg selective buying campaign were both crucial events in the creation of the civil rights m more...
Amazon Says: The 1949 Briggs vs. Elliot case that originated in Clarendon County and the Orangeburg selective buying campaign were both crucial events in the creation of the civil rights movement that changed the course of United States history. Out-of-the-Box in Dixie is the story of these heroic people whose quest for equality, sacrifices and contributions should not be forgotten. It was the Briggs vs. Elliot case that caused the national office of the NAACP to redirect its approach from suing for "separate but equal" facilities to challenging segregation as a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. On May 17, 1954, the United States Supreme Court handed down the decision that segregation in public schools violated the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution. This publication is dedicated to documenting the unobtrusive heroism and actions of many people who have been inadequately represented in interpretive discussion relative to desegregation and equality in America. less...
Amazon

Diana K. Says: Orangeburg 1968 documents one of the least remembered chapters of America's Civil Rights history--the Orangeburg Massacre.
Amazon Says: Orangeburg 1968 documents one of the least remembered chapters of America's Civil Rights history the Orangeburg Massacre. On February 8, 1968, over 150 students gathered on th more...
Amazon Says: Orangeburg 1968 documents one of the least remembered chapters of America's Civil Rights history the Orangeburg Massacre. On February 8, 1968, over 150 students gathered on the campus of South Carolina State University to protest the segregation policies of the town s only bowling alley. Amid escalating tensions, students protested by building a bonfire on the edge of the campus. State Highway Patrolmen fired live ammunition into the unarmed group in an attempt to end the protest. Killed were Henry Smith, Samuel Hammond, both students at South Carolina State University, and Delano Middleton, a 17-year-old Wilkinson High School student. The Orangeburg Massacre was the first incident of its kind on an American university campus but it received little national attention and almost no mention in histories of the Civil Rights Movement. In producing this outstanding volume, Sonny DuBose, author of The Road to Brown, and Cecil Williams, author-photographer of Out-of-the Box in Dixie, and Freedom and Justice, compiled interviews and photographs of living participants and observers. In addition, participants are included interviewed by Avery Research Institute College of Charleston. Williams exclusive and extraordinary photographs from this publication will also be featured in 10 seconds in Orangeburg, a PBS documentary scheduled in March 2008 and Black Magic, an ESPN program to debut in 2008. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: This collection of essays by eight historians -- along with an epilogue by noted scholar Donald G. Mathews -- not only expands historical investigation of race and ethnicity i more...
Amazon Says: This collection of essays by eight historians -- along with an epilogue by noted scholar Donald G. Mathews -- not only expands historical investigation of race and ethnicity in the South in fresh directions, but also dissects more thoroughly some traditional aspects of the topic. Addressing subjects from the 1830s to the 1990s, all of the essays underscore the constant struggle to define and redefine ethnic boundaries and etiquettes to match changing historical circumstances. Two essays use the history of military activity in the South to offer insights about evolving relationships between whites and Indians. Samuel J. Watson investigates the Seminole War in Florida while Clayton E. Jewett looks at battles between white Texans and Indians during the early period of the Civil War.James Wilson and David McGee contribute to historians' deepening understanding of the redefinition of racial and ethnic relations during Reconstruction. Wilson analyzes the postbellum implications of Louisiana's three-tiered antebellum racial structure, while McGee delves into the differing fortunes of urban and rural blacks in Wake County, North Carolina, following Emancipation.Angela Boswell and Stephen Brown ensure that other ethnic identities in the South are not forgotten. Boswell addresses domestic violence in nineteenth-century Colorado County, Texas, and includes Germans, as well as blacks and other whites, in her pathbreaking study. Brown offers a subtle reinterpretation of the Leo Frank lunching by examining Frank's Jewish identity within the context of southern honor and "whiteness."Nancy Lopez and Jeff Roche subject more recent events to close study. Lopez tells the story of the childmurders in Atlanta in the late 1970s and early 1980s and relates them to the racial tensions remaining in the city despite the civil rights movement. Roche presents the equally fascinating story of Asa/Forrest Carter, a white supremacist from Alabama who cunningly adopted an Indian identity as the author of the much-loved "autobiographical" The Education of Little Tree. These emerging scholars contribute to the study of legal, military, cultural, and women's history, while demonstrating that race and ethnicity are woven deeply into all those aspects of the South's past. less...
Amazon
  • Columbia63 | Our Story Matters
    By gathering images, artifacts, and testimony, the mission of the Columbia SC 63 project is to ensure that a more accurate and expansive history becomes familiar to all.
  • Civil Rights Sundays at The Nickelodeon
    The Nickelodeon Theatre is honored to partner with Columbia SC 63, and SCETV to present CIVIL RIGHTS SUNDAYS.
Print

Comment about this page...