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Dying Green: The Eco-Friendly Burial Movement in SC

What do death and ecological conservation have in common? More than you might think.

Join us for a screening of the short documentary Dying Green on Monday, April 15th from 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm in the Bostick Auditorium at the Main Library. This film explores the environmentally friendly burial practices of Dr. Billy Campbell, a Family Practitioner in Westminster, South Carolina.

In 1998, Dr. Campbell opened a land preserve to be used as a cemetery for natural burials, which decline all modern techniques for delaying composition such as the use of embalming fluids. As a result, the land will be preserved and protected from contamination and development for generations to come.

After the screening, we will host a discussion panel about this emerging methodology, including the documentarian herself, Ellen Tripler, as well as several experts on green burial from across the state.


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Dying Green -- Trailer
Sarah G. Says: Film Trailer for the Documentary Dying Green
YouTube Says: Dying Green: Living green is something many of us strive for in today's world, but did you know that you can die green as well? Set in the foothills of the Appalachians, Dying...
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