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Dying Green: The Eco-Friendly Burial Movement in SC

What do death and ecological conservation have in common? More than you might think.

Join us for a screening of the short documentary Dying Green on Monday, April 15th from 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm in the Bostick Auditorium at the Main Library. This film explores the environmentally friendly burial practices of Dr. Billy Campbell, a Family Practitioner in Westminster, South Carolina.

In 1998, Dr. Campbell opened a land preserve to be used as a cemetery for natural burials, which decline all modern techniques for delaying composition such as the use of embalming fluids. As a result, the land will be preserved and protected from contamination and development for generations to come.

After the screening, we will host a discussion panel about this emerging methodology, including the documentarian herself, Ellen Tripler, as well as several experts on green burial from across the state.


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Dying Green -- Trailer
Sarah G. Says: Film Trailer for the Documentary Dying Green
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