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Foxy Lady: Adventure and Intrigue with a Revolutionary South Carolina Woman

Plantation owner, Revolutionary War patriot, wealthy heiress, and mother-in-law of Major-General Thomas Pinckney -- Rebecca Brewton Motte is one fascinating woman.

Celebrate Women's History Month and join Richland Library Literary Resident Chris Weatherhead -- star of film, stage, and TV -- as she takes you on a journey of intrigue, battles with the British, and some mysterious arrows through her portrayal of spunky Rebecca Motte.

Rebecca and the Fox: Flames of Freedom from the Heart of a Revolutionary Woman will be in the Main Library Auditorium on Saturday, March 9th from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.


The Courageous Patriot by Idella Bodie
Amazon Says: In 1780, during the Revolutionary War, Charleston fell in the hands of the British. British officers looked for a large Charleston home to use as their headquarters. They chos more...
Amazon Says: In 1780, during the Revolutionary War, Charleston fell in the hands of the British. British officers looked for a large Charleston home to use as their headquarters. They chose the Miles Brewton House at 27 King Street. This was the home of Rebecca Brewton Motte, sister of the home's builder. The British forced Rebecca to remain in the home as serve as their hostess. This is the story of Rebecca Brewton Motte and her courageous sacrifice that helped America win its independence from England. less...
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Amazon Says: In 1779, Sir Henry Clinton and more than eight thousand British troops left the waters of New York to try a new tack in the war against the American patriots - capturing the c more...
Amazon Says: In 1779, Sir Henry Clinton and more than eight thousand British troops left the waters of New York to try a new tack in the war against the American patriots - capturing the colonies' most important southern port. Clinton and his officers believed that the capture of Charleston, South Carolina, would change both the seat of the war and its character. The British were correct on both counts but the effect of the charge was defeat. In this comprehensive study of the 1780 siege and surrender of Charleston, Carl P. Borick offers a full examination of the strategic and tactical elements of Clinton's operations. Suggesting that scholars traditionally have underestimated its importance, Borick contends that the siege was one of the most wide-ranging, sophisticated, and critical campaigns of the war. While striking a devastating blow to American morale, it transformed the war in South Carolina from a conventional eighteenth-century conflict into a partisan war. Borick examines the reasons for the shift in British strategy, the efforts of their army and navy to seize Charleston, and the difficulties the patriots faced as they defended the city. He analyzes the actions and decisions of key figures in the campaign including Benjamin Lincoln, William Moultrie, Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Charles Cornwallis, and Banastre Tarleton. Borick also delves into the effect of the campaign on South Carolina civilians. He suggests that while British leaders had expected to find multitudes of loyalist sympathizers in the south, the conduct of British soldiers and sailors there actually served to arouse more antipathy than allegiance. Drawing on letters, journals, and other records kept by American, British, and Hessian participants, Borick relies on an impressive array of primary and secondary sources relating to the siege. He includes contemporaneous and modern maps that depict the British approach to the city and the complicated military operations that led to the patriots' greatest defeat of the American Revolution. less...
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Amazon Says: In South Carolina in 1780, fourteen-year-old Caroline sees the Revolutionary War take a terrible toll on her family and friends, and comes to understand the true nature of war more...
Amazon Says: In South Carolina in 1780, fourteen-year-old Caroline sees the Revolutionary War take a terrible toll on her family and friends, and comes to understand the true nature of war. less...
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Amazon Says: From one of the South′s foremost historians, this is the dramatic story of the conflict in South Carolina that was one of the most pivotal contributions to the American Revo more...
Amazon Says: From one of the South′s foremost historians, this is the dramatic story of the conflict in South Carolina that was one of the most pivotal contributions to the American Revolution. In 1779, Britain strategised a war to finally subdue the rebellious American colonies with a minimum of additional time, effort, and blood. Setting sail from New York harbour with 8,500 ground troops, a powerful British fleet swung south towards South Carolina. One year later, Charleston fell. And as King George′s forces pushed inland and upward, it appeared the six-year-old colonial rebellion was doomed to defeat. In a stunning work on forgotten history, acclaimed historian Walter Edgar takes the American Revolution far beyond Lexington and Concord to re-create the pivotal months in a nation′s savage struggle for freedom. It is a story of military brilliance and devastating human blunders - and the courage of an impossibly outnumbered force of demoralised patriots who suffered terribly at the hands of a merciless enemy, yet slowly gained confidence through a series of small triumphs that convinced them their war could be won. Alive with incident and colour. less...
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South Carolina: A History by Walter B. Edgar
Amazon Says: In the first comprehensive history of South Carolina published in nearly fifty years, Walter Edgar presents a sweeping narrative of a state with an illustrious, sometimes infa more...
Amazon Says: In the first comprehensive history of South Carolina published in nearly fifty years, Walter Edgar presents a sweeping narrative of a state with an illustrious, sometimes infamous, past. He describes in very human terms 475 years of recorded history in the Palmetto State, including the experiences of all South Carolinians - rich and poor; male and female; those with roots in Africa and in Europe as well as Native Americans. In an eminently readable presentation, Edgar uses letters, diaries, and other writings to let voices from the past take part in telling the state's fascinating story. less...
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Amazon Says: A look at the rise and decline of the Pinckney family whose members were present at every major point in Charleston's history. more...
Amazon Says: A look at the rise and decline of the Pinckney family whose members were present at every major point in Charleston's history. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: This modern, annotated adaptation of the original three-volume edition of Women of the American Revolution by Elizabeth Ellet restores, in a single volume, a unique compilatio more...
Amazon Says: This modern, annotated adaptation of the original three-volume edition of Women of the American Revolution by Elizabeth Ellet restores, in a single volume, a unique compilation of the roles played by eighty-four American women in the Revolutionary War. A best-seller in the 1850s, Ellet's work is here carefully edited for today's readers by a distinguished Revolutionary War historian. It contains a new introduction and many explanatory footnotes. A new organization arranges these biographies from north to south by colony, underlining the vast differences in class and culture among the various states.While not America's earliest female historian, Elizabeth Ellet may easily lay claim to being America's first historian of women. Before publication of her books, readers had come close to losing track of the important role played by women in the War for Independence. Ellet preserved these valuable stories through reliance, whenever possible, on first-person accounts which are still as fresh and compelling today as they were in the nineteenth century. A vivid and comprehensive account which will be of interest to both military historians and scholars of women's history. less...
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Amazon Says: The American Revolution was a home-front war that brought scarcity, bloodshed, and danger into the life of every American, and Carol Berkin shows us that women played a vital more...
Amazon Says: The American Revolution was a home-front war that brought scarcity, bloodshed, and danger into the life of every American, and Carol Berkin shows us that women played a vital role throughout the struggle. Berkin takes us into the ordinary moments of extraordinary lives. We see women boycotting British goods in the years before independence, writing propaganda that radicalized their neighbors, raising funds for the army, and helping finance the fledgling government. We see how they managed farms, plantations, and businesses while their men went into battle, and how they served as nurses and cooks in the army camps, risked their lives seeking personal freedom from slavery, and served as spies, saboteurs, and warriors. She introduces us to sixteen-year-old Sybil Ludington, who sped through the night to rouse the militiamen needed to defend Danbury, Connecticut; to Phillis Wheatley, literary prodigy and Boston slave, who voiced the hopes of African Americans in poems; to Margaret Corbin, crippled for life when she took her husband’s place beside a cannon at Fort Monmouth; to the women who gathered firewood, cooked, cleaned for the troops, nursed the wounded, and risked their lives carrying intelligence and participating in reconnaissance missions. Here, too, are Abigail Adams, Deborah Franklin, Lucy Knox, and Martha Washington, who lived with the daily knowledge that their husbands would be hanged as traitors if the revolution did not succeed. A recapturing of the experiences of ordinary women who lived in extraordinary times, and a fascinating addition to our understanding of the birth of our nation. less...
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