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Kyle Taylor as Frederick Douglass, Actors' Theatre of SC
Kyle Taylor as Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass...No Turning Back

Frederick Douglass, one of our greatest American heroes, was an electrifying orator, abolitionist, Christian leader, writer and newspaper editor, with great wit and wisdom.

He thrilled audiences across America and England in his quest to abolish slavery and create true freedom and equality in America.

In this captivating and emotional one-act play, the award-winning Actors' Theatre of South Carolina brings Douglass back to life and invites the audience to experience first-hand an incredible moment in American history.

6:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 10th

Richland Library Sandhills

Douglass was a slave until he escaped in 1838 at age 20. After his escape, he went on to achieve astounding accomplishments as a stunning and eloquent agent of social reform. He could have chosen to live in Europe, but felt God called him to create freedom for all people in America, so he returned and spent his life challenging our society.

Starring Kyle Taylor as Frederick Douglass. Also appearing, Clarence Felder. Directed by Chris Weatherhead.

Recently presented at Piccolo Spoleto to rave reviews:

"...a theatrical triumph...a roller coaster of emotion..." Mark Leon, Charleston Daily

"...heartbreaking and commanding, befitting an American hero known for his mastery of rhetoric..." Chase Ferron, Post & Courier


Amazon Says: In 1845, just seven years after his escape from slavery, the young Frederick Douglass published this powerful account of his life in bondage and his triumph over oppression. T more...
Amazon Says: In 1845, just seven years after his escape from slavery, the young Frederick Douglass published this powerful account of his life in bondage and his triumph over oppression. The book, which marked the beginning of Douglass's career as an impassioned writer, journalist, and orator for the abolitionist cause, reveals the terrors he faced as a slave, the brutalities of his owners and overseers, and his harrowing escape to the North. It has become a classic of American autobiography. This edition of the book, based on the authoritative text that appears in Yale University Press's multivolume edition of the Frederick Douglass Papers, is the only edition of Douglass's Narrative designated, as an Approved Text by the Modern Language Association's Committee on Scholarly Editions. It includes a chronology of Douglass's life, a thorough introduction by the eminent Douglass scholar John Blassingame, historical notes, and reader responses to the first edition of 1845. less...
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Amazon Says: Illus. in black-and-white. Opening note by Coretta Scott King. For the first time, the most important account ever written of a childhood in slavery is accessible to young rea more...
Amazon Says: Illus. in black-and-white. Opening note by Coretta Scott King. For the first time, the most important account ever written of a childhood in slavery is accessible to young readers. From his days as a young boy on a plantation to his first months as a freeman in Massachusetts, here are Douglass's own firsthand experiences vividly recounted--expertly excerpted and powerfully illustrated. less...
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Amazon Says: A biography of the man who, after escaping slavery, became an orator, writer, and leader in the abolitionist movement in the nineteenth century. more...
Amazon Says: A biography of the man who, after escaping slavery, became an orator, writer, and leader in the abolitionist movement in the nineteenth century. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: A major history of Civil War America through the lens of its two towering figures: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. "My husband considered you a dear friend," M more...
Amazon Says: A major history of Civil War America through the lens of its two towering figures: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. "My husband considered you a dear friend," Mary Todd Lincoln wrote to Frederick Douglass in the weeks after Lincoln's assassination. The frontier lawyer and the former slave, the cautious politician and the fiery reformer, the president and the most famous black man in America—their lives traced different paths that finally met in the bloody landscape of secession, Civil War, and emancipation. Opponents at first, they gradually became allies, each influenced by and attracted to the other. Their three meetings in the White House signaled a profound shift in the direction of the Civil War, and in the fate of the United States. In this first book to draw the two together, James Oakes has written a masterful narrative history. He brings these two iconic figures to life and sheds new light on the central issues of slavery, race, and equality in Civil War America. less...
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Amazon Says: The inspirational, true story of how Frederick Douglass found his way to freedom one word at a time. This picture book biography chronicles the youth of Frederick Dou more...
Amazon Says: The inspirational, true story of how Frederick Douglass found his way to freedom one word at a time. This picture book biography chronicles the youth of Frederick Douglass, one of the most prominent African American figures in American history. Douglass spent his life advocating for the equality of all, and it was through reading that he was able to stand up for himself and others. Award-winning husband-wife team Lesa Cline-Ransome and James E. Ransome present a moving and captivating look at the young life of the inspirational man who said, “I would unite with anybody to do right and with nobody to do wrong.” less...
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Amazon Says: The influence Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln had on each other and on the nation altered the course of slavery and the outcome of the Civil War. more...
Amazon Says: The influence Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln had on each other and on the nation altered the course of slavery and the outcome of the Civil War. Although Abraham Lincoln deeply opposed the existence of slavery, he saw his mission throughout much of the Civil War as preserving the U nion, with or without slavery. Frederick Douglass, a former slave, passionately believed the war's central mission to be the total abolition of slavery. During their meetings between 1863 and 1865, and through reading each other's speeches and letters, they managed to forge a strong, mutual understanding and respect that helped convince Lincoln the war could not be truly won without black soldiers and permanent emancipation. less...
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Majestic In His Wrath by Frederick S. Voss
Amazon Says: Shortly before his death, abolitionist Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was asked what course black youths should follow in the face of continuing racism in this country. He rep more...
Amazon Says: Shortly before his death, abolitionist Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was asked what course black youths should follow in the face of continuing racism in this country. He replied, "Agitate! Agitate! Agitate!" An eloquent crusader, orator, and journalist, Douglass left a legacy of moral conviction and determination that inspired the civil rights movement of the twentieth century. A pictorial history of Douglass's life, Majestic in His Wrath uses paintings, prints, photographs, documents, cartoons, and other memorabilia to trace Douglass's progress from his youth as a slave to his lasting stature as one of this country's most honored African American leaders. The book documents Douglass's early years, his escape to freedom in 1838 and emergence as an abolitionist firebrand, his post-Civil War record as a champion of African American rights, and his later career, which included an appointment as U.S. minister to Haiti. The book's more than seventy illustrations include images of Douglass, prominent abolitionist contemporaries John Brown and William Lloyd Garrison, and fellow black reformers Sojourner Truth, Henry Highland Garnet, and Charles Remond, among others. The book presents the legal papers pertaining to the purchase of Douglass's freedom, a note in which he pleads for help in spiriting three run-away slaves to Canada, and his letter to President Lincoln outlining a scheme to encourage slave desertions during the Civil War. Commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of Douglass's death, Majestic in His Wrath is published with the National Portrait Gallery and the National Park Service. less...
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