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Tonight! An Evening with Morihiko Nakahara

Calling all classical music lovers! Join us tonight in Film & Sound at the Main library. Meet the conductor of the South Carolina Philharmonic and learn about their upcoming concert schedule.

Tuesday, February 5th, 6:00-7:00 p.m. -- Main Library Film & Sound, 1431 Assembly Street

Be sure to put these upcoming SC Philharmonic events on your calendar, too:

Tuesday, April 9th, 7:00-8:30 p.m. -- Sandhills Branch Meeting Room, 1 Summit Parkway

Tuesday, April 16th, 6:00-7:00 p.m. -- Main Library Film & Sound, 1431 Assembly Street


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