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Happy Anniversary, WLTX!

"Don't change that dial" wasn't a problem on Sept 1, 1953 when Columbia's first television station went live in their Jefferson Hotel studio at 1801 Main St. WNOK-TV, now WLTX, was on channel 67 and was the only television station available for Columbia viewers at that time. It featured live local shows and a selection of programs from CBS including: Arthur Godfrey and His Friends and the game show Dollar a Second. Local talent, Jack Cook, better known as Handy Andy was brought over from WNOK's radio station to be their TV announcer.


Glued to the Set by Steven D Stark
Amazon Says: In this entertaining and informative book, journalist and political commentator Steven Stark takes us on a guided tour of the tube, and charts with unique wit and intelligence more...
Amazon Says: In this entertaining and informative book, journalist and political commentator Steven Stark takes us on a guided tour of the tube, and charts with unique wit and intelligence how America came of age, so to speak, in a box - watching everything from "I Love Lucy," "All in the Family," "The Brady Bunch," and "Saturday Night Live," to the CBS Evening News, "Roots," MTV, and "ER." Glued to the set asks the simple question - What has TV done to us? - and answers it with startling revelations about the power of its sixty most important shows and events. From Beaver to Roseanne, from Ed Sullivan to Oprah, from the blanket coverage of the early space program to the hearings for Watergate and the Clarence Thomas nomination, television has done more than simply record history and echo our culture. It has made us who we are, and Steven Stark has managed to catch in bright focus this hilarious, strange, and thrilling image of ourselves. less...
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Amazon Says: Based on interviews with the technicians, producers, and actors behind TV's early programs, the author creates an entertaining history of the medium, from the inventor of th more...
Amazon Says: Based on interviews with the technicians, producers, and actors behind TV's early programs, the author creates an entertaining history of the medium, from the inventor of the laugh machine to the quiz show scandals. 20,000 first printing. National ad/promo. less...
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Amazon Says: An anecdote-filled recollection of a bygone golden age He created Hee Haw, the number-one show on TV. He wrote and produced variety shows for Jackie Gleason, Andy Williams, more...
Amazon Says: An anecdote-filled recollection of a bygone golden age He created Hee Haw, the number-one show on TV. He wrote and produced variety shows for Jackie Gleason, Andy Williams, Judy Garland, Julie Andrews, Sonny and Cher, and Perry Como. He invented the rock TV show Hullabaloo. He was the most popular producer of his time — a time when variety television was king. With his writing/producing partner John Aylesworth, Frank Peppiatt developed dozens of TV shows but their career began on air in the initial days of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, alongside other talented newcomers like Norman Jewison and Arthur Hiller. Then came a call from New York to write for the Eydie Gorme/Steve Lawrence show in 1958, and quickly “A & P” became the most in-demand writing and producing team around. Peppiatt, a man who spent his life behind the scenes writing comedy and turning entertainers into household names, now recounts his own remarkable life story: a humble Canadian boy who grew up to create iconic American TV shows amid a cast of Hollywood celebrities. When Variety Was King captures the early days of TV with humour and spice. less...
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Science on American Television: A History by Marcel Chotkowski LaFollette
Amazon Says:  As television emerged as a major cultural and economic force, many imagined that the medium would enhance civic education for topics like science. And, indeed, television so more...
Amazon Says:  As television emerged as a major cultural and economic force, many imagined that the medium would enhance civic education for topics like science. And, indeed, television soon offered a breathtaking banquet of scientific images and ideas—both factual and fictional. Mr. Wizard performed experiments with milk bottles. Viewers watched live coverage of solar eclipses and atomic bomb blasts. Television cameras followed astronauts to the moon, Carl Sagan through the Cosmos, and Jane Goodall into the jungle. Via electrons and embryos, blood testing and blasting caps, fictional Frankensteins and chatty Nobel laureates, television opened windows onto the world of science. But what promised to be a wonderful way of presenting science to huge audiences turned out to be a disappointment, argues historian Marcel Chotkowski LaFollette in Science on American Television. LaFollette narrates the history of science on television, from the 1940s to the turn of the twenty-first century, to demonstrate how disagreements between scientists and television executives inhibited the medium’s potential to engage in meaningful science education. In addition to examining the content of shows, she also explores audience and advertiser responses, the role of news in engaging the public in science, and the making of scientific celebrities. Lively and provocative, Science on American Television establishes a new approach to grappling with the popularization of science in the television age, when the medium’s ubiquity and influence shaped how science was presented and the scientific community had increasingly less control over what appeared on the air. less...
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