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# 42 and the Baseball Jeffcoats

The Jeffcoat brothers are indisputably the Midlands' most successful baseball brothers. Charlie, George, and Bill played in the major leagues after each pitched their high schools to a state championship: Charlie at Batesburg-Leesville and George and Bill at Brookland-Cayce. After high school the brothers tied their laces for the Columbia Mill Ducks in the South Carolina Textile League before moving to "the show." This picture, featuring the brothers in their Ducks uniform, was published in The State on March 31, 1935.

Although famous for his right-handed curveball, George Jeffcoat also has a place in history for being assigned #42 by the Brooklyn Dodgers during the 1939 season. It wasn’t until April 15, 1947, that the number was next assigned to a new Brooklyn Dodgers player, Jackie Robinson. After finally being retired in 1997, the number 42 has never been donned again except on Jackie Robinson Day, when all MLB players are invited to wear the number on their team jersey.


Amazon Says: It is not known exactly when base ball first made its way down to the Carolinas, but it was being played in North and South Carolina at least as early as the Civil War. By the more...
Amazon Says: It is not known exactly when base ball first made its way down to the Carolinas, but it was being played in North and South Carolina at least as early as the Civil War. By the early years of the twentieth century, the game had become a dominant form of entertainment in both states--and has remained a part of many communities across the Carolinas ever since. This work is a collection of 25 nonfiction stories about baseball as it has been played in the Carolinas from its early days to the present. Contributors to this work include Marshall Adesman writing about his love for the Durham Athletic Park, David Beal remembering the last bus trip the Winston-Salem Warthogs made to play the Durham Bulls in 1997 before the Bulls became a Triple A team, Robert Gaunt writing about the All-American Girls Baseball League and its players in South Carolina, Thomas Perry telling the story of Shoeless Joe Jackson's start in baseball in the textile leagues, Parker Chesson relating the 1947 Albemarle League playoff, and Bijan Bayne chronicling black professional baseball in North Carolina from World War I to the Depression, just to name a few. less...
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Baseball in Columbia by Mark Bryant
Amazon Says: In the heart of South Carolina, Columbia, the state's capital city, boasts an impressive and long-standing baseball history. More like a patchwork quilt than a finely woven ta more...
Amazon Says: In the heart of South Carolina, Columbia, the state's capital city, boasts an impressive and long-standing baseball history. More like a patchwork quilt than a finely woven tapestry, the city's baseball character comes from the colorful bits and pieces that have come together over time. Since the emergence of the first recognized teams over a century ago, various clubs have passed through the South Carolina Midlands baseball scene. Despite this somewhat uneven history, Columbia has enjoyed three major eras of athletic success and prosperity: the Columbia Comers, the Columbia Reds/Gems, and the Columbia Mets/Capital City Bombers. These remarkable teams have carried the thrill of the great American pastime to generations of South Carolina fans, who have proudly watched their players win pennants and produce Hall of Fame athletes. less...
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Amazon Says: April 15, 1947, marked the most important opening day in baseball history. When Jackie Robinson stepped onto the diamond that afternoon at Ebbets Field, he became the first bl more...
Amazon Says: April 15, 1947, marked the most important opening day in baseball history. When Jackie Robinson stepped onto the diamond that afternoon at Ebbets Field, he became the first black man to break into major-league baseball in the twentieth century. World War II had just ended. Democracy had triumphed. Now Americans were beginning to press for justice on the home front-and Robinson had a chance to lead the way.He was an unlikely hero. He had little experience in organized baseball. His swing was far from graceful. And he was assigned to play first base, a position he had never tried before that season. But the biggest concern was his temper. Robinson was an angry man who played an aggressive style of ball. In order to succeed he would have to control himself in the face of what promised to be a brutal assault by opponents of integration.In Opening Day, Jonathan Eig tells the true story behind the national pastime's most sacred myth. Along the way he offers new insights into events of sixty years ago and punctures some familiar legends. Was it true that the St. Louis Cardinals plotted to boycott their first home game against the Brooklyn Dodgers? Was Pee Wee Reese really Robinson's closest ally on the team? Was Dixie Walker his greatest foe? How did Robinson handle the extraordinary stress of being the only black man in baseball and still manage to perform so well on the field? Opening Day is also the story of a team of underdogs that came together against tremendous odds to capture the pennant. Facing the powerful New York Yankees, Robinson and the Dodgers battled to the seventh game in one of the most thrilling World Series competitions of all time.Drawing on interviews with surviving players, sportswriters, and eyewitnesses, as well as newly discovered material from archives around the country, Jonathan Eig presents a fresh portrait of a ferocious competitor who embodied integration's promise and helped launch the modern civil rights era. Full of new details and thrilling action, Opening Day brings to life baseball's ultimate story. less...
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