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Are You Prepared?

It’s devastating to witness the destruction that natural disasters can cause, in just a matter of minutes. And while we can’t prevent these occurrences, being prepared can certainly protect us and our loved ones.

Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins June 1, and scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) say they expect to see 13 to 20 named storms this season. Living near the South Carolina coast puts us on heightened awareness – so make sure that you have the knowledge and resources you need to be prepared in case disaster should strike.

Resources

  • SC Emergency Management Division
  • National Hurricane Center – NOAA
  • Hurricane information from CDC
  • Hurricane information from the EPA
  • Hurricane Resource Page – NASA
  • Hurricane information from the National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health

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