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Capital City Stadium

Batter up at Palmetto Park?

Capital City Stadium has a long recreational history. As early as 1825 the Mills Atlas shows a “Fisher's Mill Pond” located on the property. In 1852 the Charleston Courier reported that the temperature had dropped so much Columbians were ice skating on Fisher’s Mill Pond. The early part of the twentieth century brought an end to the historic Fisher’s Mill Pond when the Olympia Mill bought and drained the property.

The roaring twenties brought new life to the property when Columbia planned to build a new baseball park. Architect, Harold Tatum, submitted plans to build a stadium at Maxcy Gregg Park. But, on May 20th, 1927 Dreyfuss Field opened on the former site of Fisher’s Mill Pond.

After a three year, WWII imposed, hiatus baseball came back to Columbia with a big contest to rename Dreyfuss Field in 1946. Palmetto Park, Roosevelt Field and Byrnes Field were all names considered for the newly renovated baseball field. But it was Rosale Gelbhaus who won the $100.00 Victory Bond and two season passes with the winning entry: Capital City Stadium.


Baseball in Columbia by Mark Bryant
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