Literacy 2030 Meeting Summary: September 17, 2014 | Richland Library Skip to content

Literacy 2030 Meeting Summary: September 17, 2014

Literacy providers signed in and joined a table focused on either School Readiness, Grade-Level Literacy, or Family Literacy.  Each participant received updated copies of the Conceptual Frameworks developed for each of these three priority literacy areas.  Leigh D’Amico from USC’s Office of Program Evaluation (OPE) discussed developing outcomes, which was the next step in this year’s Literacy 2030 work.  Leigh defined outcomes as:  “clean, specific, measurable characteristics that allow the evaluator to monitor if a desired change has occurred,” and she used a case study to better explain the definition. Outcomes should be SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time specific). The steps of outcome creation:

  1. Identify population
  2. Determine desired result
  3. Select indicator (quality and timeliness of the data matter)

All three groups worked to create possible outcomes for their priority area’s conceptual framework, and after much discussion, each reported out to share their outcome suggestions.  Surprisingly, there were about three possible outcomes for each group: 

School Readiness

Population:  4-year-old children
Outcome:  Increase in 4-year-old students enrolled in 4K in Richland County
Indicator:  Enrollment data from 4K programs
 
Population:  4-year-old children
Outcome:  4K classrooms have the capacity to enroll all eligible children in Richland County
Indicator:  All students signed up for 4K are enrolled
 
Population:  4K students
Outcome:  4K students score higher on 5K readiness test than children in 5K who did not attend 4K
Indicator:  Scores from standardized 5K readiness assessment

Grade-Level Literacy

Population:  3rd and 8th graders
Outcome:  90% of 3rd and 8th graders are scoring at or above proficient of grade-level literacy by 2020
Indicator:  National and state standardized assessments (e.g. PASS, end-of-course and end-of-grade assessments)
 
Population:  Special education and elementary reading teachers
Outcome:  100% of special education and elementary reading teachers are trained in research-based reading instruction by 2018
Indicator:  Statewide Read to Succeed data, teacher evaluation data
 
Population:  Schools and community organizations
Outcome:  Increase in strategic and targeted community partnerships that contribute to measureable progress of student achievement
Indicator:  Number of partnerships formed between schools and organizations, number of children recruited for community services through schools, student assessment data for students participating in programs offered by partnering community organizations
 
Family Literacy
 
Population:  Families with identified literacy gaps
Outcome:  Achieving increased proficiency in literacy skills
Indicator:  Number of books read in the home per week, parental attendance at school meetings, number of successfully employed families
 
Population:  Underserved adults with literacy needs that have primary or secondary influence on school-age children
Outcome:  Increased number of individuals accessing literacy services
Indicator:  Number of adults accessing services
 
Population:  Underserved adults with literacy needs that have primary or secondary influence on school-age children
Outcome:  Increased connectivity between literacy services
Indicator:  Number of partnerships formed between serving organizations, literacy coalition data
 
Population:  Underserved adults with literacy needs that have primary or secondary influence on school-age children
Outcome:  Increased number of screenings to identify learning differences
Indicator:  Number of adults screened with literacy assessment, number of adults showing improvement on literacy screenings
 
As a conclusion to the meeting, Denise Lyons, Deputy Director of Statewide Development for the South Carolina State Library (SCSL), discussed the Literacy 2030 website (www.literacy2030.org), which is currently undergoing renovations, as well as facilitation training provided for library Directors, program managers, and other staff who are interested in learning facilitation skills to help with this type of community-wide collaborative work. They offered facilitation training sessions with Anne Sinclair in September and October, but are hoping to offer more dates in the future. Denise also mentioned that some SCSL grants would be given to libraries in South Carolina for Literacy 2030 efforts, especially rural areas.  She urged conveners to think about how their organizations or others might work with libraries in other counties to improve literacy.

 


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