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Looking for Longleaf

When the first European settlers arrived in the Southeast, the woodlands they encountered were quite different from what we see today. Instead of crowded stands of hardwood trees choked with bushes and vines, they saw vast expanses of tall longleaf pines, widely spaced and with a ground carpeting of grasses and wildflowers.

It’s estimated that longleaf pine forests once covered more than ninety million acres in the Southeast, stretching from southern Virginia to eastern Texas. These beautiful woodlands, which supported a complex ecosystem of animal and plant life, gradually diminished owing to logging, the naval stores industry (tar and turpentine), and fire suppression. (The longleaf thrived under a regime of periodic lightning-induced fires and controlled burns, which removed accumulated clutter in the understory.) Now only a little more than three million acres remain.

If you would like to learn more about the longleaf, as well as current efforts to restore longleaf forests throughout the Southeast, the Richland Library has several books you will enjoy. Be sure also to check out the websites of the Longleaf Alliance and America’s Longleaf Restoration Initiative.


Amazon Says: Greenwood Plantation in the Red Hills region of southwest Georgia includes a rare one-thousand-acre stand of old-growth longleaf pine woodlands, a remnant of an ecosystem that more...
Amazon Says: Greenwood Plantation in the Red Hills region of southwest Georgia includes a rare one-thousand-acre stand of old-growth longleaf pine woodlands, a remnant of an ecosystem that once covered close to ninety million acres across the Southeast. The Art of Managing Longleaf documents the sometimes controversial management system that not only has protected Greenwood's "Big Woods" but also has been practiced on a substantial acreage of the remnant longleaf pine woodlands in the Red Hills and other parts of the Coastal Plain. Often described as an art informed by science, the Stoddard-Neel Approach combines frequent prescribed burning, highly selective logging, a commitment to a particular woodland aesthetic, intimate knowledge of the ecosystem and its processes, and other strategies to manage the longleaf pine ecosystem in a sustainable way. The namesakes of this method are Herbert Stoddard (who developed it) and his colleague and successor, Leon Neel (who has refined it). In addition to presenting a detailed, illustrated outline of the Stoddard-Neal Approach, the book--based upon an extensive oral history project undertaken by Paul S. Sutter and Albert G. Way, with Neel as its major subject--discusses Neel's deep familial and cultural roots in the Red Hills; his years of work with Stoddard; and the formation and early years of the Tall Timbers Research Station, which Stoddard and Neel helped found in the pinelands near Tallahassee, Florida, in 1958. In their introduction, environmental historians Sutter and Way provide an overview of the longleaf ecosystem's natural and human history, and in his afterword, forest ecologist Jerry F. Franklin affirms the value of the Stoddard-Neel Approach. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: Eastern Old-Growth Forests is the first book devoted exclusively to old growth throughout the East. Authoritative essays from leading experts examine the ecology and character more...
Amazon Says: Eastern Old-Growth Forests is the first book devoted exclusively to old growth throughout the East. Authoritative essays from leading experts examine the ecology and characteristics of eastern old growth, explore its history and value-both ecological and cultural- and make recommendations for its preservation.The book provides a thorough over-view of the importance of old growth in the East including its extent, qualities, and role in wildlands restoration. It will serve a vital role in furthering preservation efforts by making eastern old-growth issues better known and understood. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: The decline of bird species in a wide range of North American habitats -- forests, prairies, shrublands, mountain regions, marshes, and deserts -- has inspired two decades of more...
Amazon Says: The decline of bird species in a wide range of North American habitats -- forests, prairies, shrublands, mountain regions, marshes, and deserts -- has inspired two decades of intense scientific study of bird ecology and conservation. But for professional scientists and amateur birders alike, interpreting the results of these diverse studies is often complex and bewildering. This accessible book pulls together recent research on bird species and habitats to show how basic ecological principles apply in seemingly different situations. Robert A. Askins provides an engaging introduction to bird ecology and concepts of landscape ecology, focusing on such intriguing species as Bachman's Warbler, Red Crossbill, Mountain Plover, and Marbled Murrelet.Understanding the ancient landscapes of North America and how humans have changed them, Askins says, is essential for devising plans to protect and restore bird populations. In addition to such obvious changes to the landscape as the clearing of forests and plowing of prairies, more subtle changes also dramatically affect birds. Species may disappear when we interrupt natural disturbances by suppressing wildfires or trapping out beaver, or when we disrupt habitat with roads and housing developments. Askins challenges some of the assumptions that underlie current conservation efforts and offers concrete recommendations, based on sound ecological principles, for protecting the rich natural diversity of North America's birds. less...
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