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Lugenia Hammond's crusade

The Second Tennesee and First Rhode Island regiments arrived in Columbia in early November 1898 before heading off to the Spanish American War. They were the first troops to be stationed at the new Camp Fornance located in the rural area north of Columbia. The military camp lasted only a few months but the name still refers to the neighborhood on the other side of Elmwood Cemetery.

In the early 1970’s the neighborhood gained the attention of state leaders through the passion and dedication of Lugenia Hammond. She advocated for the community and the substandard living conditions. The area was annexed by the city of Columbia in 1971 and received a HUD urban renewal grant. Soon the Camp Fornance project was underway and a new housing project was named in honor of Ms. Hammond.

Lugenia Hammond was inducted into the 1991 South Carolina Black Hall of Fame and was an honoree featured in the 1993 African American Calendar.


Columbia by Vennie Deas-Moore
AmazonDebbie B. Says: Photographs describe African American life in Columbia, SC.
Amazon Says: South Carolina's capital city enjoys a strong African-American presence, one that has had considerable influence on the growth and development of Columbia's commerce and cultu more...
Amazon Says: South Carolina's capital city enjoys a strong African-American presence, one that has had considerable influence on the growth and development of Columbia's commerce and culture since the city's creation in the late 1700s. The challenges of the antebellum South, Reconstruction, the Civil Rights era, and even the present have shaped a vibrant and dynamic black community, which supplies a wealth of leaders for the city, state, and nation. less...
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