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March 1963

Civil rights news moved away from Harvey Gantt and drifted back home to the midlands in March 1963.

The United States Supreme Court remanded the convictions of 373 students in Orangeburg based on the grounds that the free speech and free assembly rights of the students were violated. NAACP lawyers Matthew Perry and Lincoln Jenkins represented the students who served 30 days in jail or paid a fine of $50.00 for their peaceful demonstrations at local segregated lunch counters. The case was returned to the South Carolina Supreme Court were the convictions were upheld a second time. The U.S. Supreme Court permanently reversed the Columbia decision in October 1963.


Amazon Says: Book by Smith, Charles U. more...
Amazon Says: Book by Smith, Charles U. less...
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Amazon Says: "This is a photographic journey back into the legally segregated world in which I grew up. A world entirely shaped by race and color. This book is an eyewitness account of man more...
Amazon Says: "This is a photographic journey back into the legally segregated world in which I grew up. A world entirely shaped by race and color. This book is an eyewitness account of many sociological events having a direct impact on my life. These events also affected the lives of millions of blacks and whites, especially those who lived in the Deep South. My pictures most often salute the unknown people who put their lives on the line to confront and change a system of segregation and racism. At a time when our nation still struggles with the issue of race, hopefully this book will promote racial harmony and the need for acceptance shared by all people, despite their racial, ethnic, and religious heritage." less...
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