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Photo courtesy of the FBI

Today in History with a Twist: November 27, 2013

Public Enemy #1 Gunned Down!

     1934 - FBI Agents gunned down bank robber Baby Face Nelson in shoot-out with the FBI in Barrington, Illinois.  The Chicago born gangster was a notorious bank robber and murderer.  He had associated himself with John Dillinger and helped him to escape from prison.  He has the dubious distinction of having killed more FBI agents in the line of duty than any other person.  His friends called him Jimmy but he got his famous nickname when Chicago Mayor Bill Thompson's wife, who described him as having a baby face after he robber her of her jewels that were valued at $18,000. - Sounds like the Mayor was a bit of a crook himself.

     Happy Hanukkah!  Tonight at sundown marks the beginning of the eight-day Jewish celebration of Hanukkah, also known as the Festival of Lights! Hanukkah starts on a different day each year according to the Western calendar, but it always begins on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar.  The word “Hanukkah” means dedication or induction, and the holiday signifies the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem after the Maccabees revolted against Alexander, Antiochus IV and his persecution of the Jews.  According to the Talmud, at the time of the rededication there was only enough oil left to burn the eternal flame in the temple for one day.  It lasted for eight days - just the amount of time needed to make a fresh supply of oil.  Hence, it is tradition at Hanukkah to light a candle on the menorah for each of the eight nights of Hanukkah. (Punchbowl.com)

     1895 - At the Swedish-Norwegian Club in Paris, Alfred Nobel, Inventor of dynamite and arms manufacturer, signs his last will and testament, setting aside his estate to establish the Nobel Prize after he dies. - Feeling a little guilt, are we?

     1901 - The U.S. Army War College is established in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.  It provides graduate level instruction to senior military officers and civilians to prepare them for senior leadership assignments and responsibilities. - Wish I would have made it that far, sounds like fun. 

     1868 - Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer leads an attack on a Cheyenne camp supporting a war party led by Chief Black Kettle at the Battle of Washita River.  Over a hundred Cheyenne warriors were killed in the attack including Chief Black Kettle.  Unknown to Custer there were several other Indian encampments in the area and warriors started to show up to investigate the situation.  Realizing he was now outnumbered Custer started to withdraw but when his supply train was threatened he advanced toward the Indians who withdrew. - Custer probably learned the wrong lesson there.

     1095 - Pope Urban II declares the First Crusade at the Council of Clermont.  The initial primary goal was a response to an appeal from Byzantine Emperor Alexios I Komnenos, who requested that western volunteers come to his aid and help to repel the invading Seljuq Turks from Anatolia.  An additional goal soon became the principal objective - the Christian reconquest of the sacred city of Jerusalem and the Holy Land and the freeing of the Eastern Christians from Islamic rule. - They may eventually liberate Jerusalem but they were not welcome guests in many of the places they travelled through. 

      2001 - A hydrogen atmosphere is discovered on the extrasolar planet Osiris by the Hubble Space Telescope, the first atmosphere detected on an extrasolar planet. - Warm up the Stargate.

Today's birthdays:

     1874 - Charles A. Beard - American historian (d. 1948) - Famous for his economic history of the birth of America, but lost his influence when he came out agains the U.S. involvement in World War Two. - Have to stick with a winner.

     1874 - Chaim Weizmann, Israeli politician, 1st President of Israel (d. 1952) - Took a war to get him a country. 

     1942 - Jimi Hendrix - Singer-songwriter, guitarist, and producer (The Jimi Hendrix Experience and The Blue Flame) (d. 1970) - Airborne trained, Vietnam War Veteran who could play the guitar a little bit.

Have a Happy Thanksgiving.

To learn more about the above topics check out the following books from the Library's collection:


Amazon Says: Gangsters. The Mob. The Mafia. John Dillinger. Lucky Lucchese. Al Capone. The Untouchables. John Gotti. The Chin. Don Corleone. Tony Soprano. In real life, in literature, in m more...
Amazon Says: Gangsters. The Mob. The Mafia. John Dillinger. Lucky Lucchese. Al Capone. The Untouchables. John Gotti. The Chin. Don Corleone. Tony Soprano. In real life, in literature, in movies and television, no saga has so gripped the human consciousness and imagination as gangsters and the war on crime. On the streets and on the big and small screens, the mob world has made for vivid pictures and unimaginable stories, and for nearly 70 years LIFE has been there to chronicle all the action and mayhem. From the all-too-real Naked City photography of the legendary Weegee to the brilliant depictions of Francis Ford Coppola's films, the story of the Mafia will be revealed in this exciting, gripping book. Note the infamous photographs from inside the speakeasies, from inside the cells, from inside the government's investigations and from the backlots of productions ranging from Cagney's "Public Enemy" to HBO's "Sopranos". LIFE takes on the mob and brings it to you in this stunning pictorial hardback. less...
Amazon

Celebrating Hanukkah by Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith
Amazon Says: Presents the history, traditions, and significance of Hanukkah as it is celebrated by a Jewish family in San Francisco. more...
Amazon Says: Presents the history, traditions, and significance of Hanukkah as it is celebrated by a Jewish family in San Francisco. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: A biography of the inventor of dynamite and the founder of the Nobel Prize uses Nobel's unpublished letters to offer a compelling account of this introverted, sickly, moody, y more...
Amazon Says: A biography of the inventor of dynamite and the founder of the Nobel Prize uses Nobel's unpublished letters to offer a compelling account of this introverted, sickly, moody, yet ultimately humane man. less...
Amazon

The Custer Reader by Paul Andrew Hutton
Amazon Says: A comprehensive introduction to General Custer combines first-person narratives, scholarly articles, photographic essays, and original contributions in four sections that co more...
Amazon Says: A comprehensive introduction to General Custer combines first-person narratives, scholarly articles, photographic essays, and original contributions in four sections that cover "The Civil War," "The Indian Wars," "Little Big Horn," and "The Custer Myth." less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: In this classic work Jonathan Riley-Smith considers the realities of the events surrounding the beginning of the crusading age. He discusses the launching of the First Crusade more...
Amazon Says: In this classic work Jonathan Riley-Smith considers the realities of the events surrounding the beginning of the crusading age. He discusses the launching of the First Crusade, Pope Urban's message, the practical experience of the crusaders and the i less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: With a resolution more than ten times sharper than any telescope on Earth, the Hubble Space Telescope has seen more than 72 sextillion miles into the universe into events that more...
Amazon Says: With a resolution more than ten times sharper than any telescope on Earth, the Hubble Space Telescope has seen more than 72 sextillion miles into the universe into events that took place more than 12 billion years ago. This spectacular collection of more than 200 color photos taken through Hubble presents a stupendous view of the universe. less...
Amazon

Ron S. Says: Beard's classic economic interpretation of the framing of the Constitution
Amazon Says: An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States is a 1913 book by American historian Charles A. Beard. It argues that the structure of the Constitution of more...
Amazon Says: An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States is a 1913 book by American historian Charles A. Beard. It argues that the structure of the Constitution of the United States was motivated primarily by the personal financial interests of the Founding Fathers. More specifically, Beard contends that the Constitutional Convention was attended by, and the Constitution was therefore written by, a "cohesive" elite seeking to protect its personal property (especially bonds) and economic standing. Beard examined the occupations and property holdings of the members of the convention from tax and census records, contemporaneous news accounts, and biographical sources, demonstrating the degree to which each stood to benefit from various Constitutional provisions. Beard pointed out, for example, that George Washington was the wealthiest landowner in the country, and had provided significant funding towards the Revolution. Beard traces the Constitutional guarantee that the newly formed nation would pay its debts to the desire of Washington and similarly situated lenders to have their costs refunded. less...
Amazon
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