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Today in History with a Twist: November 4, 2013

Tut Found!

     1922 - In Egypt, British archaeologist Howard Carter and his men find the entrance to Pharaoh Tutankhamen's tomb in the Valley of the Kings.  The tomb was significant due to it being virtually untouched by grave robbers. - It would take 17 years for the mummy's curse to get Carter.  Cue Steve Martin....

     They probably celebrated the find with some candy.  It’s National Candy Day! Humans have been eating candies and sweet confections for thousands of years.  The ancient Egyptians preserved nuts and fruits in honey, and the Aztecs and Mayans consumed chocolate during religious rituals as early as 300 AD.  Today, there are thousands of different types of candy, all with their own unique history.  For example, did you know that Tootsie Rolls were created by Leo Hirschfeld of New York in 1896?  He named them after his daughter, who was nicknamed "Tootsie."  The average American eats twenty-five pounds of candy each year. (That makes me an average American sometime in January)  That may seem like a lot, but the average person in Denmark eats thirty-six pounds each year! (Punchbowl.com)

      1791 - The United States Army suffered its greatest defeat at the hands of American Indians at the Battle of the Wabash.  Both sides numbered around 1,000. In the battle over 800 soldiers and camp followers were killed and another 300 wounded.  The Indians suffered less than 100 casualties.  The Indians, led by Little Turtle and Blue Jacket, were able to surprise the Americans by waiting in a nearby woods until the soldiers stacked their weapons and lined up to eat breakfast.  The battle lasted over three hours but the Army could not recover from the initial surprise.  President Washington had sent the force to the Northwest Territory (Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin, as well as the northeastern part of Minnesota, America was a lot smaller then) to subdue the Miami Indians (now you know why there is a Miami, Ohio) who were fighting settlers in the recently acquired, due to the victory in the revolution, territory and had killed over 1,500 settlers.  The Miami were initially singled out because the United States has overestimated their size and influence in the region.  The war would eventually end up being with the Western Confederacy made up of representatives of over twenty Tribes. - Now that the area is now called the Midwest I think you can figure out who won the war.

     1939 - U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders the United States Customs Service to implement the Neutrality Act of 1939, allowing cash-and-carry purchases of weapons by belligerents.  Though this meant that countries from either side could buy weapons in the United States its primary purpose was to allow the Allies, most prominently England, the ability to build up their armies to stand up to Germany. - I'm sure England got some credit under the table.

     1952 - The National Security Agency (NSA) is established. Its existence was denied for years and it was said that NSA stood for 'No Such Agency'.  Despite Hollywood's depiction, NSA has very few 'spies'; they do their intelligence collection through the monitoring of communications systems. - I was only half joking when I said I don't have a cell phone because I don't want other people listening to my private conversations.

     1890 - City & South London Railway: London's first deep-level tube railway opens between King William Street and Stockwell. - Where's platform 9 3/4s?

     1960 - At the Kasakela Chimpanzee Community in Tanzania, Dr. Jane Goodall observes chimpanzees creating tools, the first-ever observation in non-human animals. - Were they trying to make a typewriter?

Today we celebrate the birthdays of:

     1879 - Will Rogers - Actor and political commentator. (d. 1935) - He never met me.

     1918 - Art Carney - Actor (d. 2003) - He'll always be Ed Norton to me.

To learn more about the above topics check out the following books from the Library's collection:


Amazon Says: In 1922, the British archaeologist Henry Carter opened King Tutankhamun’s tomb, illuminating the glories of an ancient civilization. And while the world celebrated the extra more...
Amazon Says: In 1922, the British archaeologist Henry Carter opened King Tutankhamun’s tomb, illuminating the glories of an ancient civilization. And while the world celebrated the extraordinary revelation that gave Carter international renown and an indelible place in history, by the time of his death, the discovery had nearly destroyed him. Now, in a stunning feat of narrative nonfiction, Daniel Meyerson has written a thrilling and evocative account of this remarkable man and his times. Carter began his career inauspiciously. At the age of seventeen–unknown, untrained, untried–he was hired as a copyist of tomb art by the brash, brilliant, and boldly unkempt father of modern archaeology, W. F. Petrie. Carter struck out on his own a few years later, sensing that something amazing lay buried beneath his feet, waiting for him to uncover it. But others had the same idea: The ancient cities of Egypt were crawling with European adventurers and their wealthy sponsors, each hoping to outdo the others with glittering discoveries–even as growing nationalist resentment against foreigners plundering the country’s most treasured antiquities simmered dangerously in the background. Not until Carter met up with the risk-taking, adventure-loving occultist Lord Carnarvon did his fortunes change. There were stark differences in personality and temperament between the cantankerous Carter and his gregarious patron, but together they faced down endless ridicule from the most respected explorers of the day. Seven dusty and dispiriting years after their first meeting, their dream came to astonishing life. But there would be a price to pay for this partnership, their discovery, and the glory and fame it brought both men–and the chain of events that transpired in the wake of their success remains fascinating and shocking to this day. An enthralling story told with unprecedented verve, In the Valley of the Kings is a tale of mania and greed, of fame and lost fortune, of history and its damnations. As he did in The Linguist and the Emperor, Daniel Meyerson puts his exciting storytelling powers on full display, revealing an almost forgotten time when past and present came crashing together with the power to change–or curse–men’s lives. less...
Amazon


Amazon Says: The 50 easy-to-follow mouth-watering recipes for hard and soft candies, plus helpful tips, interesting side bars, make this a valuable kitchen resource. more...
Amazon Says: The 50 easy-to-follow mouth-watering recipes for hard and soft candies, plus helpful tips, interesting side bars, make this a valuable kitchen resource. less...
Amazon


Amazon Says: The author of A Sorrow in Our Heart: The Life of Tecumseh traces the settling of the Ohio River Valley, in a fictional account of the battle between Native Americans and set more...
Amazon Says: The author of A Sorrow in Our Heart: The Life of Tecumseh traces the settling of the Ohio River Valley, in a fictional account of the battle between Native Americans and settlers that marked a turning point in the history of the frontier. less...
Amazon


Amazon Says: Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award, U.S. History category "In Roosevelt's Second Act Richard Moe has shown in superb fashion that what might seem to have been an inevitable deci more...
Amazon Says: Winner of the 2013 PROSE Award, U.S. History category "In Roosevelt's Second Act Richard Moe has shown in superb fashion that what might seem to have been an inevitable decision of comparatively little interest was far from it." --David McCullough On August 31, 1939, nearing the end of his second and presumably final term in office, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was working in the Oval Office and contemplating construction of his presidential library and planning retirement. The next day German tanks had crossed the Polish border; Britain and France had declared war. Overnight the world had changed, and FDR found himself being forced to consider a dramatically different set of circumstances. In Roosevelt's Second Act, Richard Moe focuses on a turning point in American political history: FDR's decision to seek a third term. Often overlooked between the passage and implementation of the New Deal and the bombing of Pearl Harbor, that decision was far from inevitable. As the election loomed, he refused to comment, confiding in no one, scrambling the politics of his own party; but after the Republicans surprisingly nominated Wendell Willkie in July 1940, FDR became convinced that no other Democrat could both maintain the legitimacy of the New Deal and mobilize the nation for war. With Hitler on the verge of conquering Europe, Roosevelt, still hedging, began to maneuver his way to the center of the political stage. Moe offers a brilliant depiction of the duality that was FDR: the bold, perceptive, prescient and moral statesman who set lofty and principled goals, and the sometimes cautious, ambitious, arrogant and manipulative politician in pursuit of them. Immersive, insightful and written with an inside understanding of the presidency, this book challenges and illuminates our understanding of FDR and this pivotal moment in American history. less...
Amazon


Amazon Says: The National Security Agency is the world’s most powerful, most far-reaching espionage. Now with a new afterword describing the security lapses that preceded the attacks of more...
Amazon Says: The National Security Agency is the world’s most powerful, most far-reaching espionage. Now with a new afterword describing the security lapses that preceded the attacks of September 11, 2001, Body of Secrets takes us to the inner sanctum of America’s spy world. In the follow-up to his bestselling Puzzle Palace, James Banford reveals the NSA’s hidden role in the most volatile world events of the past, and its desperate scramble to meet the frightening challenges of today and tomorrow. Here is a scrupulously documented account–much of which is based on unprecedented access to previously undisclosed documents–of the agency’s tireless hunt for intelligence on enemies and allies alike. Body of secrets is a riveting analysis of this most clandestine of agencies, a major work of history and investigative journalism. less...
Amazon


Amazon Says: In July 1864, Thomas Briggs was traveling home after visiting his niece and her husband for dinner. He boarded a first-class carriage on the 9:45 pm Hackney service of the Nor more...
Amazon Says: In July 1864, Thomas Briggs was traveling home after visiting his niece and her husband for dinner. He boarded a first-class carriage on the 9:45 pm Hackney service of the North London railway. At Hackney, two bank clerks discovered blood in the seat cushions as well as on the floor, windows, and sides of the carriage. A bloodstained hat was found on the seat along with a broken link from a watch chain. The race to identify the killer and catch him as he fled on a boat to America was eagerly followed by the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Kate Colquhoun tells a gripping tale of a crime that shocked the era. less...
Amazon


Jane Goodall: 40 Years at Gombe by Jane Goodall Institute
Amazon Says: On the occasion of Dr Jane Goodall''s 40th anniversary of research with the chimpanzees of Gombe, this illustrated volume traces the story of her work from its singular beginn more...
Amazon Says: On the occasion of Dr Jane Goodall''s 40th anniversary of research with the chimpanzees of Gombe, this illustrated volume traces the story of her work from its singular beginning to the Jane Goodall Institute''s present day international activities.' less...
Amazon


Amazon Says: Biography. A Will Rogers Treasury is the first book to present the best and most important selections from the writings of Will Rogers, one of America's best-known and most-be more...
Amazon Says: Biography. A Will Rogers Treasury is the first book to present the best and most important selections from the writings of Will Rogers, one of America's best-known and most-beloved humorists. less...
Amazon


Art Carney: A Biography by Michael Seth Starr
Amazon Says: The first biography of the legendary superstar, this moving story covers Carney's life from his role as Ed Norton, Jackie Gleason's goofy sidekick on The Honeymooners, to hi more...
Amazon Says: The first biography of the legendary superstar, this moving story covers Carney's life from his role as Ed Norton, Jackie Gleason's goofy sidekick on The Honeymooners, to his struggles with clinical depression and alcoholism. IP. less...
Amazon

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