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Today in History with a Twist: October 15, 2013

They Didn't Want Cake!

1793 - Queen Marie-Antoinette of France is tried and convicted in a swift, pre-determined trial in the Palais de Justice, Paris, and condemned to death the following day. - Kind of fitting that the judge was playing acting just like Marie-Antoinette liked to do.

     Today is White Cane Safety Day. White Cane Safety Day celebrates and recognizes the achievements of the blind and visually impaired, and their independence.  That independence is represented by the white cane that they use to travel from place to place.  The white cane is an invaluable tool for the blind. It affords blind people a freedom of movement they otherwise may not have.  The white cane is a well recognized symbol of independence. If you know someone who is blind or visually impaired, celebrate this day with him or her.  We suggest you let them take you for a walk.  On October 15, 1964, a Joint resolution of Congress passed legislation marking this day.  President Lyndon Johnson immediately issued a proclamation declaring this day to be White Cane Safety Day.  This is an annual proclamation. (http://holidayinsights.com/moreholidays/October/whitecanesafetyday.htm)

     1917 - At Vincennes outside of Paris, Dutch dancer Mata Hari is executed by firing squad for spying for the German Empire. - Not a good day for women in France.

     1529 - The Siege of Vienna ends as the Austrians rout the invading Turks, turning the tide against almost a century of unchecked conquest throughout eastern and central Europe by the Ottoman Empire. - They'll be back.

     1764 - Edward Gibbon observes a group of friars singing in the ruined Temple of Jupiter in Rome, which inspires him to begin work on The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. - Now that I think about it I can see the symbolism there.

     1934 - The Soviet Republic of China collapses when Chiang Kai-shek's National Revolutionary Army successfully encircles Ruijin, forcing the fleeing Communists to begin the Long March. - It's a good thing they walked everywhere anyway.

     1951 - The first episode of I Love Lucy, a television sitcom starring Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, and William Frawley, airs on the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS). - Who can forget when Lucy and Ethel got the job at the chocolate factory.

Today we celebrate the birthdays of:

     1844 - Friedrich Nietzsche, German philosopher (d. 1900) - With a name like that no wonder the Nazis were inspired by him.

      1917 - Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. - Historian and critic (d. 2007) - He has been referred to as a public intellectual, are there closet intellectuals?

 

To learn more about the above topices check out the the books below from the Library's collection


Amazon Says: Describes Marie Antoinette's childhood in Vienna and her marriage to Louis XVI and the political climate of France during her husband's reign more...
Amazon Says: Describes Marie Antoinette's childhood in Vienna and her marriage to Louis XVI and the political climate of France during her husband's reign less...
Amazon

Mata Hari: The True Story by Russell Warren Howe
Amazon Says: Through privileged access to the sealed, sixty-eight-year-old dossier containing the records of the secret trial of Mata Hari, the seductress-spy executed in France as a Germa more...
Amazon Says: Through privileged access to the sealed, sixty-eight-year-old dossier containing the records of the secret trial of Mata Hari, the seductress-spy executed in France as a German spy, the author presents an intriguing account of the German and French intelligence services during World War I less...
Amazon

China: The Long March by Anthony Lawrence
Amazon Says: China: The Long March [Nov 01, 1986] Lawrence, Anthony and Brake ... and others, Brian more...
Amazon Says: China: The Long March [Nov 01, 1986] Lawrence, Anthony and Brake ... and others, Brian less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: An entertaining guide to the creative and medium-shaping personalities who are responsible for the television we watch explores the most important figures in television, their more...
Amazon Says: An entertaining guide to the creative and medium-shaping personalities who are responsible for the television we watch explores the most important figures in television, their works, and their impact. Tour. less...
Amazon

Ron S. Says: Three Volumes
Amazon Says: The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire has always maintained its initial appeal to both the general public and scholars alike. Its sheer scale is daunting, encompassing over more...
Amazon Says: The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire has always maintained its initial appeal to both the general public and scholars alike. Its sheer scale is daunting, encompassing over a millennium of history, covering not merely the Western Empire from the days of the early emperors to its extinction in AD 476, but also the Eastern Empire, which lasted for another thousand years until the Turks vanquished it in 1453. But Gibbon's style, part historical fact and part literature, is enticing, and the sheer honesty of the man, who endeavours to be scrupulously impartial in his presentation, endears him to the reader. In this recording, David Timson incorporates the most salient of Gibbon's footnotes. In Volume I (chapters I - XV), Gibbon opens by setting the scene with the Empire as it stood in the time of Augustus (d. AD 14) before praising the time of the Antonines (AD 98 - 180). The death of Marcus Aurelius and the accession of Commodus and his successors ushers in turbulent and dangerous times which were only occasionally marked by a wise and temperate ruler. The volume ends in AD 324, with Constantine the Great becoming undisputed Roman emperor, uniting both the East and Western Empires. less...
Amazon
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