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Today in History with a Twist: October 15, 2013

They Didn't Want Cake!

1793 - Queen Marie-Antoinette of France is tried and convicted in a swift, pre-determined trial in the Palais de Justice, Paris, and condemned to death the following day. - Kind of fitting that the judge was playing acting just like Marie-Antoinette liked to do.

     Today is White Cane Safety Day. White Cane Safety Day celebrates and recognizes the achievements of the blind and visually impaired, and their independence.  That independence is represented by the white cane that they use to travel from place to place.  The white cane is an invaluable tool for the blind. It affords blind people a freedom of movement they otherwise may not have.  The white cane is a well recognized symbol of independence. If you know someone who is blind or visually impaired, celebrate this day with him or her.  We suggest you let them take you for a walk.  On October 15, 1964, a Joint resolution of Congress passed legislation marking this day.  President Lyndon Johnson immediately issued a proclamation declaring this day to be White Cane Safety Day.  This is an annual proclamation. (http://holidayinsights.com/moreholidays/October/whitecanesafetyday.htm)

     1917 - At Vincennes outside of Paris, Dutch dancer Mata Hari is executed by firing squad for spying for the German Empire. - Not a good day for women in France.

     1529 - The Siege of Vienna ends as the Austrians rout the invading Turks, turning the tide against almost a century of unchecked conquest throughout eastern and central Europe by the Ottoman Empire. - They'll be back.

     1764 - Edward Gibbon observes a group of friars singing in the ruined Temple of Jupiter in Rome, which inspires him to begin work on The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. - Now that I think about it I can see the symbolism there.

     1934 - The Soviet Republic of China collapses when Chiang Kai-shek's National Revolutionary Army successfully encircles Ruijin, forcing the fleeing Communists to begin the Long March. - It's a good thing they walked everywhere anyway.

     1951 - The first episode of I Love Lucy, a television sitcom starring Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, and William Frawley, airs on the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS). - Who can forget when Lucy and Ethel got the job at the chocolate factory.

Today we celebrate the birthdays of:

     1844 - Friedrich Nietzsche, German philosopher (d. 1900) - With a name like that no wonder the Nazis were inspired by him.

      1917 - Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. - Historian and critic (d. 2007) - He has been referred to as a public intellectual, are there closet intellectuals?

 

To learn more about the above topices check out the the books below from the Library's collection


Amazon Says: This biography of Marie Antoinette, reveals how despite an unhappy marriage to the maladroit French Dauphin, she matured into a capable and courageous queen. Her final act of more...
Amazon Says: This biography of Marie Antoinette, reveals how despite an unhappy marriage to the maladroit French Dauphin, she matured into a capable and courageous queen. Her final act of courage was to follow her husband and his family to the scaffold, despite having urged him to save them all. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: 1978, hardcover edition, Playboy Press, Chicago, IL. 182 pages. Black and white photo gallery. The author became the first blind person in over 100 years to enter a medical sc more...
Amazon Says: 1978, hardcover edition, Playboy Press, Chicago, IL. 182 pages. Black and white photo gallery. The author became the first blind person in over 100 years to enter a medical school. Here is his inspiring story, which was filmed as JOURNEY FROM DARKNESS, a 2-hour TV drama. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: Set against the background of turn-of-the-century Paris and the collapse of the Belle Epoque in World War I, this book offers a complete portrait of the famous courtesan Mata more...
Amazon Says: Set against the background of turn-of-the-century Paris and the collapse of the Belle Epoque in World War I, this book offers a complete portrait of the famous courtesan Mata Hari who launched strip tease dancing, and attempts to answer the riddles surrounding her life story. Given access to Mata Hari's sealed dossier, Howe argues convincingly that Mata Hari was, in fact, a victim of collusion between Germany and France and her prosecution and death sentence was a cover-up for corruption and high-level espionage. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: In his Warriors of God and Dogs of God , James Reston, limned two epochal conflicts between Islam and Christendom. Here he examines the ultimate battle in that centuries- more...
Amazon Says: In his Warriors of God and Dogs of God , James Reston, limned two epochal conflicts between Islam and Christendom. Here he examines the ultimate battle in that centuries-long war, which found Europe at its most vulnerable and Islam on the attack. This drama was propelled by two astonishing young sovereigns: Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and Turkish sultan Suleyman the Magnificent. Though they represented two colliding worlds, they were remarkably similar. Each was a poet and cultured cosmopolitan; each was the most powerful man on his continent; each was called "Defender of the Faith"; and each faced strident religious rebellion in his domain. Charles was beset by the "heresy" of Martin Luther and his fervid adherents, even while tensions between him and the pope threatened to boil over, and the upstart French king Francis I harried Charles's realm by land and sea. Suleyman was hardly more comfortable on his throne. He had earned his crown by avoiding the grim Ottoman tradition of royal fratricide. Shiites in the East were fighting off the Sunni Turks' cruel repression of their "heresy." The ferocity and skill of Suleyman's Janissaries had expanded the Ottoman Empire to its greatest extent ever, but these slave soldiers became rebellious when foreign wars did not engage them. With Europe newly hobbled and the Turks suffused with restless vigor, the stage was set for a drama that unfolded from Hungary to Rhodes and ultimately to Vienna itself, which both sides thought the Turks could win. If that happened, it was generally agreed that Europe would become Muslim as far west as the Rhine. During these same years, Europe was roiled by constant internal tumult that saw, among other spectacles, the Diet of Worms, the Sack of Rome, and an actual wrestling match between the English and French monarchs in which Henry VIII's pride was badly hurt. Would-could-this fractious continent be united to repulse a fearsome enemy? less...
Amazon

China: The Long March by Anthony Lawrence
Amazon Says: China: The Long March [Nov 01, 1986] Lawrence, Anthony and Brake ... and others, Brian more...
Amazon Says: China: The Long March [Nov 01, 1986] Lawrence, Anthony and Brake ... and others, Brian less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: This is a guide to the most important creators of big-time TV over the past 45 years. For dominant performers like Jackie Gleason and Carol Burnett to powerhouse producers lik more...
Amazon Says: This is a guide to the most important creators of big-time TV over the past 45 years. For dominant performers like Jackie Gleason and Carol Burnett to powerhouse producers like Norman Lear and Stephen Bocho, the book reviews the style, story and impact makers of prime-time TV and their influence on the largest industry of all the mass media. Covering the old-time variety shows and sit-coms, the book's cast of characters includes Milton Berle, Jack Webb and Red Skelton. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: Once regarded as a conservative critic of culture, then enlisted by the court theoreticians of Nazism, Nietzsche has come to be revered by postmodern thinkers as one of their more...
Amazon Says: Once regarded as a conservative critic of culture, then enlisted by the court theoreticians of Nazism, Nietzsche has come to be revered by postmodern thinkers as one of their founding fathers, a prophet of human liberation who revealed the perspectival character of all knowledge and broke radically with traditional forms of morality and philosophy. In Nietzsche: The Ethics of an Immoralist, Peter Berkowitz challenges this new orthodoxy, asserting that it produces a one-dimensional picture of Nietzsche's philosophical explorations and passes by much of what is provocative and problematic in his thought. Berkowitz argues that Nietzsche's thought is rooted in extreme and conflicting opinions about metaphysics and human nature. Discovering a deep unity in Nietzsche's work by exploring the structure and argumentative movement of a wide range of his books, Berkowitz shows that Nietzsche is a moral and political philosopher in the Socratic sense whose governing question is, "What is the best life?" Nietzsche, Berkowitz argues, puts forward a severe and aristocratic ethics, an ethics of creativity, that demands that the few human beings who are capable acquire a fundamental understanding of and attain total mastery over the world. Following the path of Nietzsche's thought, Berkowitz shows that this mastery, which represents a suprapolitical form of rule and entails a radical denigration of political life, is, from Nietzsche's own perspective, neither desirable nor attainable. Out of the colorful and richly textured fabric of Nietzsche's books, Peter Berkowitz weaves an interpretation of Nietzsche's achievement that is at once respectful and skeptical, an interpretation that brings out the love of truth, the courage, and the yearning for the good that mark Nietzsche's magisterial effort to live an examined life by giving an account of the best life. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: This issues-debate reader encourages critical thinking by adopting a point-counterpoint approach. In each chapter, two or more readings present opposing perspectives on contem more...
Amazon Says: This issues-debate reader encourages critical thinking by adopting a point-counterpoint approach. In each chapter, two or more readings present opposing perspectives on contemporary political issues, such as immigration and what it means to be an American, domestic surveillance, medical marijuana, assisted suicide, and the growing gap between America’s rich and poor. Over 60% of the readings are new to this edition, and all the readings address issues of major importance in American politics today. Each set of readings is preceded by an introduction that puts the essays into a broader political context and is followed by discussion questions that help prompt debate. less...
Amazon

Ron S. Says: Three Volumes
Amazon Says: Some 250 years after its first publication, Gibbon's Decline and Fall is still regarded as one of the greatest histories in Western literature. He reports on more than 1,000 y more...
Amazon Says: Some 250 years after its first publication, Gibbon's Decline and Fall is still regarded as one of the greatest histories in Western literature. He reports on more than 1,000 years of an empire which extended from the most northern and western parts of Europe to deep into Asia and Africa and covers not only events but also the cultural and religious developments that effected change during that time. In Volume I (I-XV), Gibbon opens by setting the scene with the Empire as it stood in the time of Augustus (d. 14 AD) before praising the time of the Antonines (AD98-180). But the death of Marcus Aurelius and the accession of Commodus and his successors ushers in turbulent and dangerous times which were only occasionally marked by a wise and temperate ruler. The volume ends in 324AD with Constantine the Great becoming undisputed Roman emperor uniting both the East and Western empires. It contains the first of two controversial chapters devoted to the growth of Christianity and its influence. less...
Amazon
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