Skip to content

Today in History with a Twist: September 26, 2013

Rebellion!

 

     1786 - Protestors shut down the court in Springfield, Massachusetts in a military standoff that begins Shays' Rebellion.  The rebellion was an armed uprising that took place in central and western Massachusetts in 1786 and 1787.  The unrest began on August 29, 1786, precipitated by financial difficulties brought about by a post-war economic depression, a credit squeeze caused by a lack of hard currency, and fiscally harsh government policies instituted in 1785 to solve the state's debt problems.  Protesters, including many war veterans, shut down county courts in the later months of 1786 to stop the judicial hearings for tax and debt collection.  The protesters became radicalized against the state government following the arrests of some of their leaders, and began to organize an armed force.  The rebellion took place in a political climate where reform of the country's governing document, the Articles of Confederation, was widely seen as necessary.  The events of the rebellion are widely seen to have affected the debates on the shape of the new government.  The exact nature and consequence of the rebellion's influence on the content of the Constitution and the ratification debates continues to be a subject of historical discussion and debate. - Seems like the debate over the original issues is still going on.

      One American who was trying to spread a little cheer at the time was Johnny Appleseed.  Today we honor him with Johnny Appleseed Day, one of America's great legends.  Johnny Appleseed was a real person.  John Chapman was among the American settlers who were captivated by the movement west across the continent.  As Johnny Appleseed travelled west, he planted apple trees along the way, and sold trees to settlers.  With every apple tree that was planted, the legend grew.  A Little About the Legend: John Chapman (aka Johnny Appleseed) was born on September 26, 1774.  He was a nurseryman who started out planting trees in western New York and Pennsylvania.  During the life of John Chapman, the "West" was places like Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, and Illinois.  John Chapman was a deeply religious person he was known to preach during his travels.  According to legend, Johny Appleseed led a simple life and wanted little.  He rarely accepted money and often donated any money he received.  It is believed that he died on March 11, 1845, from what was referred to as the "winter plague".  The actual date of his death has been disputed.  There is a lot of "legend" in stories written about Johny Appleseed.  By it's definition, over the years, legends grow bigger than life.  It also appears that there is some link between Johny Appleseed and very early Arbor Day celebrations. (http://holidayinsights.com/moreholidays/March/appleseedday.htm)

     1789 - Thomas Jefferson is appointed the first United States Secretary of State, John Jay is appointed the first Chief Justice of the United States, Samuel Osgood is appointed the first United States Postmaster General, and Edmund Randolph is appointed the first United States Attorney General. - Get to try out that new Government operating system, the Constitution, that they just put in place.

     1687 - The city council of Amsterdam votes to support William of Orange's invasion of England, which became the Glorious Revolution (the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland and James II of Ireland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau (William of Orange). William's successful invasion of England with a Dutch fleet and army led to his ascending of the English throne as William III of England jointly with his wife Mary II of England.) - A city council had to authorized the invasion of England, wonder if they had a strong mayor?

     1917 - The Battle of Polygon Wood begins, the battle took place during the second phase of the Third battle of Ypres and was fought near Ypres in Belgium.  The objective was to take the high ground above the main German supply route. - Sounds more like a chapter out of a Harry Potter book.

     1918 - The Meuse-Argonne Offensive, the bloodiest single battle in American history, begins.  The Americans suffered 117,000 casualties in the battle.  Many believe the battle was the decisive point in the defeat of Germany in World War I; Hindenburg himself has said this, though he may have just been trying to take the glory away from the French and English. - As much as it cost it had to have meant something.

     1933 - As gangster Machine Gun Kelly surrenders to the FBI, he shouts out, "Don’t shoot, G-Men!", which becomes a nickname for FBI agents.  He himself is probably most remembered for his nickname more than anything else; except for a kidnapping in Kansas City he did not participate in any high profile crimes.  He was so meek and mild mannered in prison the other prisoners named him Popgun Kelly. - So that's the secret, I'll have to come up with a cool nickname for myself.

     1908 - Ed Reulbach of the Chicago Cubs becomes the first and only pitcher to throw two shutouts in one day against the Brooklyn Dodgers. - No pitch count in those days.

Today we celebrate the birthdays of:

     1849 - Ivan Pavlov - Russian physiologist, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1936) - Sad that despite all that he did for the field of Psychology his dog is more famous than he is.

     1888 - T. S. Eliot - American-English publisher, playwright, and critic, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) - Someone who takes up so much shelf space here needs to be listed.

To learn more about the above topics check out the following books from the Library's collection:


Amazon Says: THIS READER WILL PROVIDE A DOCUMENTARY HISTORY OF THE CREATING AND SHAPING OF THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION. KAMMEN WILL TELL THE STORY OF THE CONSTITU- TION THROUGH THE DOCUMENTS more...
Amazon Says: THIS READER WILL PROVIDE A DOCUMENTARY HISTORY OF THE CREATING AND SHAPING OF THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION. KAMMEN WILL TELL THE STORY OF THE CONSTITU- TION THROUGH THE DOCUMENTS THAT INFLUENCED AND INTERPRETED IT; THE POLITICAL PAMPHLETS, WHERE MANY OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL ISSUES WERE FIRST ADDRESSED, THE WRITINGS OF THE FOUNDING FATHERS AND THE WRITTEN RECORDS OF VARIOUS DEBATES. THIS READER WILL INCLUDE SELECTIONS FROM "THE FEDERALIST PAPERS, THE ANTI- FEDERALIST PAPERS", MADISON'S NOTES ON THE PHILADELPHIA CONVENTION OF 1787, DEBATES IB STATE RATIFYING CONVENTIONS AS WELL AS CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN MADISON, JEFFERSON, ADAMS AND OTHERS AT THE TIME OF THE DRAFTING AND IN REFLECTION YEARS LATER. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: This profile of Jonathan Chapman appeared in Harper’s Magazine of November 1871. It was one of the earliest, if not the first, gathering of all of the facts known about the more...
Amazon Says: This profile of Jonathan Chapman appeared in Harper’s Magazine of November 1871. It was one of the earliest, if not the first, gathering of all of the facts known about the man called Johnny Appleseed. From his own admission we have learned that he started life near Boston in 1774.The first independent record of him notes his arrival in 1801, in what is now Licking County, Ohio, with a horseload of appleseeds. He also brought with him his ardent belief in the teachings of Emmanuel Swedenborg, and he spent the rest of his life spreading the gospel of this Christian mystic with an imaginative lending library plan. His mission had him continuously traversing western Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana planting and caring for his beloved apple trees. Johnny Appleseed died in 1847 near Fort Wayne.There is a monument to his memory in South Park, Mansfield, Ohio. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: A companion book to a Library of Congress bicentennial exhibition, with an introduction by Garry Wills; a narrative with more than 150 illustrations, two thirds in color and e more...
Amazon Says: A companion book to a Library of Congress bicentennial exhibition, with an introduction by Garry Wills; a narrative with more than 150 illustrations, two thirds in color and essays by scholars on Jefferson's life and thought April 2000 will launch a panoply of events celebrating the Library of Congress's 200th anniversary, the star of which will be the exhibition Thomas Jefferson: Genius of Liberty. Featuring more than 150 valuable and historic items and a rare public display of the Jefferson library that is the nucleus of the Library's collections, both the exhibition and its companion book will seek out the complex character, ideals, and motivations behind the mythic founding achievements of this brilliant son of the Enlightenment. The book's lively narrative, illuminated by Jefferson's own words, weaves back and forth between the public career--delegate to the Continental Congress, author of the Declaration of Independence and other calls to liberty, governor of Virginia, two-term president--and his life at his beloved plantation and house, Monticello. Commentaries on manuscripts explore the conflicts between his public ideals, political realities, and his private life, including the recent controversial evidence of a long liaison with his slave Sally Hemings. From his worldview to his family relationships, Thomas Jefferson provides a new and intimate sense of the man historians have only recently begun to extricate from the lofty abstractions that have born his name. The Scholars: ( Garry Wills's Lincoln at Gettysburg won a Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. ( Joseph J. Ellis is the author of the National Book Award-winning American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson; ( Annette Gordon-Reed of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy; ( Pauline Maier of American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence; ( Charles A. Miller of Jefferson and Nature: An Interpretation; Peter S. Onuf was the editor of Jeffersonian Legacies. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: This interdisciplinary volume brings together essays on eleven of the founders of the American republic--Abigail Adams, Samuel Adams, Oliver Ellsworth, Alexander Hamilton, Pat more...
Amazon Says: This interdisciplinary volume brings together essays on eleven of the founders of the American republic--Abigail Adams, Samuel Adams, Oliver Ellsworth, Alexander Hamilton, Patrick Henry, John Jay, Thomas Paine, Edmund Randolph, Benjamin Rush, Roger Sherman, and Mercy Otis Warren--many of whom are either little recognized today or little appreciated for their contributions. The essays focus on the thinking of these men and women on the proper role of religion in public life, including but not limited to the question of the separation of church and state. Their views represent a wide range of opinions, from complete isolation of church and state to tax-supported clergy.These essays present a textured and nuanced view of the society that came to a consensus on how religion would fit in the public life of the new nation. They reveal that religion was more important in the lives and thinking of many of the founders than is often portrayed and that it took the interplay of disparate and contrasting views to frame the constitutional outline that eventually emerged."For more than a decade these three editors, separately and together, have led us to a more nuanced view of the central place of religion in the American founding era. Not only were the political views of famous founders like Adams, Jefferson, and Madison more dependent on religion than their modern secular caricature allows. But many other figures, from varying religious traditions, proved equally critical to forging the original American understanding of constitutional order, democratic liberty, and rule of law. This well-crafted volume introduces a dozen such founding figures and the sterling political accomplishments that they offered the young nation on the strength of their religious convictions." --John Witte, Jr., Emory University "This excellent collection explores the rich diversity of the American mind at the Founding by attending to the spiritual, political, and intellectual convictions of a dozen men and women prominent in the events of that seminal period but relatively neglected by the historians. It fills a major gap left In the literature with its conventional fixation on the life and work of a handful of luminaries. In doing so, it takes seriously the role of religion in grounding devotion to Whig liberty and common law constitutionalism to form a popular consensus that has endured from 1776 until today. Highly readable and thoroughly sourced, this is a book for anyone interested in American history and politics." --Ellis Sandoz, Moyse Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Louisiana State University"This collection of well-crafted essays probes the "religion and the founding" question from a fresh angle. Its concentration on the second rank of founders pays rich dividends, since this focus uncovers more variety on religious issues than appear when looking only at the "Big Six" of Washington-Franklin-John Adams-Madison-Hamilton-Jefferson. The pay off is to show not only how deep but also how various were the founders' religious commitments. Historians, but also those concerned about religion in contemporary American politics, should take note--the editors have done a very fine job." --Mark Noll, University of Notre Dame"There is no book comparable to The Forgotten Founders on Religion and Public Life. It is a collection of eleven essays on the many neglected figures or, in some cases, the neglected church-state views of duly appreciated figures. The book's appeal goes beyond the realm of constitutional doctrine. In addition to constitutional lawyers, constitutional historians, historians of religion in America, and those who study American political thought will all welcome and value the book." --Gerard V. Bradley, University of Notre Dame Law School   less...
Amazon

Pershing by Jim Lacey
Amazon Says: In this persuasive biography, Jim Lacey sheds light on General Pershing's legacy as the nation's first modern combat commander, setting the standard for today's four-star offi more...
Amazon Says: In this persuasive biography, Jim Lacey sheds light on General Pershing's legacy as the nation's first modern combat commander, setting the standard for today's four-star officers. When the U.S. entered into WWI in 1917, they did so with inadequate forces. In just over a year, Pershing built and hurled a one million man army against forty battle-hardened German divisions, defending the hellish Meuse-Argonne and turning the tide of the war. With focus and clarity, Lacey traces the development of Pershing from Indian fighter, to guerrilla warrior against the Philippines insurgency to victorious commander in WWI. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: Although Russian scientist Ivan Pavlov is best known for his experiments with dogs, which were key to the development of behaviorism, few realize that he actually won the 1904 more...
Amazon Says: Although Russian scientist Ivan Pavlov is best known for his experiments with dogs, which were key to the development of behaviorism, few realize that he actually won the 1904 Nobel Prize for his research on digestion. In this latest title in the GREAT MINDS OF SCIENCE series, author Barbara Saunders examines Pavlov's enormous contributions to our modern understanding of the relationship between the mind and body. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: An international team of leading T.S. Eliot scholars contribute studies of different facets of the writer's work to build up a carefully coordinated and fully rounded introduc more...
Amazon Says: An international team of leading T.S. Eliot scholars contribute studies of different facets of the writer's work to build up a carefully coordinated and fully rounded introduction. Five chapters give a complete account of Eliot's poems and plays, while others assess the major aspects of his life and thought. Later chapters place his work in historical perspective. There is a full review of Eliot studies, and a useful chronological outline. Taken as a whole, this Companion comprises an essential handbook for students and readers of T.S. Eliot. less...
Amazon
Print

Comment about this page...