Skip to content

Today in History with a Twist: September 30, 2013

Peace In Our Time!

     1938 - At 2:00 am (never make a decision when you are tired), Britain, France, Germany and Italy sign the Munich Agreement, allowing Germany to occupy the Sudetenland region of Czechoslovakia.  In an attempt to avert another war in Europe the Wetern Powers were willing to let Germany annex the border region of Czechoslovakia known as the Sudetenland which was heavily populated by ethnic Germans.  In exchange for giving up their territory the Czechs were guarranteed that if Germany tried to take any more territory Britain and France would intervene. - A red line had been drawn and we all know about red lines.

     Wonder if they were drinking cider while they were negotiating.  Today is National Hot Mulled Cider Day!  Hot mulled cider is a delicious drink perfectly suited for crisp September afternoons.  Apple cider is produced using a cider press and is a time-honored favorite of the autumn season.  To make mulled cider, slowly add brown sugar to apple cider in a saucepan over medium heat.  Stir until all the sugar has dissolved.  Add other ingredients such as nutmeg, allspice, orange juice, and lemon juice, and bring to a boil.  Strain out the spices, pour into a mug, and add a cinnamon stick.  Enjoy National Hot Mulled Cider Day as you sip on your homemade brew! (Punchbowl.com)

     1941 - German Einsatzgruppe C (SS) conducted the Babi Yar massacre in Kiev, Ukraine.  Babi Yar was the site of several massacres throughout the war.  In all there are over 200,000 bodies buried in the ravine.  On 29-30 Septemeber 1941 over 33,000 Jews were murdered by the SS and their bodies thrown into the ravine.  Local Urkrainians assisted and watched the executions.  Believe it or not there were survivors;  One of the most often-cited parts of Anatoly Kuznetsov's documentary novel Babi Yar is the testimony of Dina Pronicheva, an actress of the Kiev Puppet Theatre, and a survivor. (The Library does have copies) - A novel about a massacre, what genre does that fall under?

     1954 - The U.S. Navy submarine USS Nautilus is commissioned as the world's first nuclear reactor powered vessel.  Using nuclear power to operate a submarine allows it to stay submerged indefinately and it doesn't have rely on other ships to fuel it while at sea.  It also allows the submarine to travel at faster speeds while submerged. - Has to get pretty rank in there.

     1882 - Thomas Edison's first commercial hydroelectric power plant (later known as Appleton Edison Light Company) begins operation on the Fox River in Appleton, Wisconsin. - Bet there's not a lot of elephants in Appleton.

     1982 - Cyanide-laced Tylenol kills six people in the Chicago area.  Seven are killed in all. - I actually met one of the victims, Mary McFarland of Elmhurst, Illinois, a couple of weeks before her death.  Not the only time that I would meet someone once only to hear on national news about their deaths shortly after, kind of creepy.

     2004 - The first images of a live giant squid in its natural habitat are taken 600 miles south of Tokyo. - Don't worry Godzilla will save us.

     1927 - Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 60 home runs in a season. - The only performance enhancing drug he used was talent, though the ball may have been juiced.

Today we celebrate the birthdays of:

     1861 - William Wrigley, Jr., American businessman, founded Wrigley Company (d. 1932) - Chewing gum and baseball what a combination!

     1924 - Truman Capote - Author (d. 1984) - Also known as Dill.

To learn more about the above topices check out the following books from the Library's collection:


Amazon Says: The dramatic narrative account of the 1938 Munich appeasement conference, in which Britain agreed to Adolf Hitler’s annexation of the Sudetenland in return for his promise n more...
Amazon Says: The dramatic narrative account of the 1938 Munich appeasement conference, in which Britain agreed to Adolf Hitler’s annexation of the Sudetenland in return for his promise never to go to war again—before tumbling inexorably into World War II. • A pivotal chapter in history: When British Prime minister Neville Chamberlain and Adolf Hitler signed an appeasement treaty in 1938, Chamberlain promised that the result would be “peace in our time.” David Faber sheds new light on the key incidents leading up to the munich meeting and its aftermath; in Berlin, we witness Hitler’s relentless preparations for war, even in the face of opposition from his own party, while in London, we watch helplessly as Chamberlain seizes executive control from his own cabinet, and makes one supreme effort after another to appease the Führer. • A timely, hot-button topic: These days, appeasement is invoked to justify everything from the war in Iraq to the West’s response to Putin’s actions in Georgia. The first major book devoted to the appeasement conference in over thirty years, Munich, 1938 draws tough conclusions sure to stir up controversy. • Impeccable research blended with powerful prose: Drawing on diaries and notes taken by Hitler and Chamberlain’s translator, Faber brings the events of 1938 alive with an insider’s feel for the political infighting he uncovers. Packed with narrative punch and vivid characters, Munich, 1938 exposes readers to the war rooms and bunkers, revealing the secret negotiations and scandals upon which the world’s fate would rest. It is modern history writing at its best. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: The Cold War was the first major conflict between superpowers in which victory and defeat were unambiguously determined without the firing of a shot. Without the shield of a s more...
Amazon Says: The Cold War was the first major conflict between superpowers in which victory and defeat were unambiguously determined without the firing of a shot. Without the shield of a strong, silent deterrent or the intellectual sword of espionage beneath the sea, that war could not have been won. John P. Craven was a key figure in the Cold War beneath the sea. As chief scientist of the Navy's Special Projects Office, which supervised the Polaris missile system, then later as head of the Deep Submergence Systems Project (DSSP) and the Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle program (DSRV), both of which engaged in a variety of clandestine undersea projects, he was intimately involved with planning and executing America's submarine-based nuclear deterrence and submarine-based espionage activities during the height of the Cold War. Craven was considered so important by the Soviets that they assigned a full-time KGB agent to spy on him. Some of Craven's highly classified activities have been mentioned in such books as "Blind Man's Bluff," but now he gives us his own insights into the deadly cat-and-mouse game that U.S. and Soviet forces played deep in the world's oceans. Craven tells riveting stories about the most treacherous years of the Cold War. In 1956 "Nautilus," the world's first nuclear-powered submarine and the backbone of the Polaris ballistic missile system, was only days or even hours from sinking due to structural damage of unknown origin. Craven led a team of experts to diagnose the structural flaw that could have sent the sub to the bottom of the ocean, taking the Navy's missile program with it. Craven offers insight into the rivalry between the advocates of deterrence (withwhom he sided) and those military men and scientists, such as Edward Teller, who believed that the United States had to prepare to fight and win a nuclear conflict with the Soviet Union. He describes the argument that raged in the Navy over the reasons for the tragic loss of the submarine "Thresher," and tells the astonishing story of the hunt for the rogue Soviet sub that became the model for "The Hunt for Red October" -- including the amazing discovery the Navy made when it eventually found the sunken sub. Craven takes readers inside the highly secret DSSP and DSRV programs, both of which offered crucial cover for sophisticated intelligence operations. Both programs performed important salvage operations in addition to their secret espionage activities, notably the recovery of a nuclear bomb off Palomares, Spain. He describes how the Navy's success at deep-sea recovery operations led to the takeover of the entire program by the CIA during the Nixon administration. A compelling tale of intrigue, both within our own government and between the U.S. and Soviet navies, "The Silent War" is an enthralling insider's account of how the submarine service kept the peace during the dangerous days of the Cold War. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: In 1903, on Coney Island, an elephant named Topsy was electrocuted, and over the past century, this bizarre, ghoulish execution has reverberated through popular culture with t more...
Amazon Says: In 1903, on Coney Island, an elephant named Topsy was electrocuted, and over the past century, this bizarre, ghoulish execution has reverberated through popular culture with the whiff of urban legend. But it really happened, and many historical forces conspired to bring Topsy, Thomas Edison, and those 6600 volts of alternating current together that day. Tracing them all in Topsy The Startling Story of the Crooked Tailed Elephant, P.T. Barnum, and the American Wizard, Thomas Edison, journalist Michael Daly weaves together a fascinating popular history, the first book on this astonishing tale. At the turn of the century, the circus in America was at its apex with the circuses of P.T. Barnum and Adam Forepaugh (or 4-Paw) competing in a War of the Elephants, with declarations of whose pachyderms were younger, bigger, or more “sacred”. This brought Topsy to America, fraudulently billed as the first native-born, and caught between the circus disputes and the War of the Currents, in which Edison and George Westinghouse (and Nikola Tesla) battled over alternating versus direct current. Rich in period Americana, and full of circus tidbits and larger than life characters—both human and elephant—Topsy is a touching tale and an entertaining read. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: Lurking in the depths of the ocean is a fearsome creature of proportions that stagger the imagination. At least sixty feet long and weighing more than a ton; with two elongate more...
Amazon Says: Lurking in the depths of the ocean is a fearsome creature of proportions that stagger the imagination. At least sixty feet long and weighing more than a ton; with two elongated, whip-like tentacles and eight grasping arms studded with toothed suckers; with a huge beak between its arms and two lidless eyes the size of dinner plates---this is the giant squid, one of the largest animals on earth and one of the least known. Until now. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: The fascinating, nearforgotten tale of how Babe Ruth revolutionized baseball and became America's biggest hero, all in a single season With World War I, the "Black Sox" more...
Amazon Says: The fascinating, nearforgotten tale of how Babe Ruth revolutionized baseball and became America's biggest hero, all in a single season With World War I, the "Black Sox" scandal, and a dearth of home runs, 1920 looked like the end of baseball. Then, in a move forever known in Boston as the "Curse of the Bambino," Babe Ruth joined the Yankees. His timing was impeccable, and his season of seasons--with a record-breaking 54 home runs--was just the tonic America needed. In Babe Ruth: Launching the Legend, baseball historian and critically acclaimed author Jim Reisler describes the remarkable impact Babe Ruth and the 1920 Yankees had on the game. Their brand of baseball was something never seen before, creating a level of excitement that rescued the game at its darkest hour. This is the story about that pivotal moment in baseball history, an era frozen in time, with Ruth on the verge of becoming a legend --and giving rise to the Yankees dynasty that endures to this day. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: The fascinating, nearforgotten tale of how Babe Ruth revolutionized baseball and became America's biggest hero, all in a single season With World War I, the "Black Sox" more...
Amazon Says: The fascinating, nearforgotten tale of how Babe Ruth revolutionized baseball and became America's biggest hero, all in a single season With World War I, the "Black Sox" scandal, and a dearth of home runs, 1920 looked like the end of baseball. Then, in a move forever known in Boston as the "Curse of the Bambino," Babe Ruth joined the Yankees. His timing was impeccable, and his season of seasons--with a record-breaking 54 home runs--was just the tonic America needed. In Babe Ruth: Launching the Legend, baseball historian and critically acclaimed author Jim Reisler describes the remarkable impact Babe Ruth and the 1920 Yankees had on the game. Their brand of baseball was something never seen before, creating a level of excitement that rescued the game at its darkest hour. This is the story about that pivotal moment in baseball history, an era frozen in time, with Ruth on the verge of becoming a legend --and giving rise to the Yankees dynasty that endures to this day. less...
Amazon

William Wrigley Jr. by M.C. Hall
Amazon Says: This work tells the story of famous businesspeople and inventors by introducing evidence that survives from the era in which the person lived. This work: uses primary source m more...
Amazon Says: This work tells the story of famous businesspeople and inventors by introducing evidence that survives from the era in which the person lived. This work: uses primary source materials to explain how we know about the person's life and how we can learn about events in the past; can be used in the Literacy Hour as examples of biological recount; and, supports the learning strands "study the lives of famous people", fins out about aspects of the past from a range of sources, ask and answer questions about the past. less...
Amazon

Truman Capote-Enfant Terrible by Robert Emmet Long
Amazon Says: A close look at the genesis of one of America's great modern writers Robert Emmet Long presents a full account of Truman Capote's early life, making use of Capote's unpublish more...
Amazon Says: A close look at the genesis of one of America's great modern writers Robert Emmet Long presents a full account of Truman Capote's early life, making use of Capote's unpublished papers. Topics covered include his strange relationship with his beautiful but immature mother (she was sixteen years old when capote was born) as well as his friendships with a series of rich and talented women. Combining biographical insights with literary criticism, Truman Capote, Enfant Terrible presents a grand overview of a complex and fascinating author: one who remained a child in appearance and behavior; a southerner who strayed from the south; a celebrity while living in the most solitary realm of his vast imagination. less...
Amazon
Print

Comment about this page...