Skip to content

Today in History with a Twist: September 16, 2013

Terrorism in America!

     1920 - 38 are killed and 400 injured were killed when a bomb in a horse wagon exploded in front of the J. P. Morgan building on Wall Street in New York City.  The bombing was never solved, although investigators and historians believe the Wall Street bombing was carried out by Galleanists (Italian anarchists), a group responsible for a series of bombings the previous year. (In late April 1919, at least 36 booby trap dynamite-filled bombs were mailed to a cross-section of prominent politicians and appointees, including the Attorney General of the United States, as well as justice officials, newspaper editors and businessmen, including John D. Rockefeller. Among all the bombs addressed to high-level officials, one bomb was notably addressed to the home of a Federal Bureau of Investigation (BOI) field agent once tasked with investigating the Galleanists, Rayme Weston Finch, who in 1918 had arrested two prominent Galleanists while leading a police raid on the offices of their publication Cronaca Sovversiva.  The bombings fed the Red Scare of 1919–20.)  The attacks were related to postwar social unrest, labor struggles and anti-capitalist agitation in the United States. - The forerunners of the Occupy Wall Street movement?

     For our friends to the south today is Mexican Independence Day celebrating Mexico's Independence from Spain.  Like the U.S. Independence Day, this day is celebrated in Mexico with parades, fiestas, fireworks, and picnics.  In 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo of Dolores, Mexico was planning a revolt to free the country from Spanish rule.  On September 15, 1810 at 11:00 PM, Father Hidalgo rang his church bell to call his parishioners, and rally them to fight off Spanish rule.  He then made a speech to his congregation, and the fight for freedom began.  Today, Mexican people mark this very special holiday, by repeating the ringing of the bells at 11:00 PM on the 15th.  It is followed by a day of celebrations on the 16th. Viva Mexico!  Have a happy Mexican Independence Day! (http://holidayinsights.com/moreholidays/September/mexicanindependence.htm)

     1812 - Things did not go so well in Russia where the Fire of Moscow began shortly after midnight and destroyed three quarters of the city days later.  The majority of the fires were started by the Russians themselves in an attempt to deny Napoleon's invading army supplies and shelter.  Over 10,000 people are believed to have died in the fire. - Can't blame Sherman for this one.

     1970 - King Hussein of Jordan declares military rule following an attempted coup by Palestinians factions operating in Jordan.  The attempted coup was an result of a dispute between the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) and the Jordanian government over the hijacking of four civilian airliners which were flown to a field in Jordan and later blown up.  The Jordanian Army then forcefully drove out the Palestinians from their territory.  Some Palestinians stayed and fought a guerrilla war resulting in the formation of the Black September Palestinian paramilitary unit. - It seems as if the Arab Countries want a Palestinian State to get them out of their countries.

     1893 - Settlers make a land run for prime land in the Cherokee Outlet (often mistakenly called the Cherokee Strip which was a 2 mile strip of land running along the northern edge of the Outlet) in Oklahoma.  The Cherokee lost control of the land at the end of the Civil War as a result of their alliance with the Confederacy.  Originally other Indians were to be settled on the land but it became valuable to the cattle industry and was again taken from the Indians. - Big business runs the country.

     1990 - The railroad between the People's Republic of China and Kazakhstan becomes complete at Dostyk, adding a sizable link to the concept of the Eurasian Land Bridge.  The Eurasian Land Bridge, sometimes called the New Silk Road, is the rail transport route for moving freight and passengers overland from Pacific seaports in the Russian Far East and China to seaports in Europe.  The route, a transcontinental railroad and rail land bridge, currently comprises the Trans-Siberian Railway, which runs through Russia and is sometimes called the Northern East-West Corridor, and the New Eurasian Land Bridge or Second Eurasian Continental Bridge, running through China and Kazakhstan. - Did they drive a golden Spike?

     1959 - The first successful photocopier, the Xerox 914, is introduced in a demonstration on live television from New York City. - I want to know when the first person made a photocopy of a body part.

Today we celebrate the birthdays of:

     1823 - Francis Parkman - Historian (d. 1893) best known as author of The Oregon Trail: Sketches of Prairie and Rocky-Mountain Life and his monumental seven-volume France and England in North America.  These works are still valued as historical sources and as literature.  He was also a leading horticulturist, briefly a Professor of Horticulture at Harvard University and the first leader of the Arnold Arboretum, and author of several books on the topic. - Tainted by an ethnocentric slant to his writings.

     1891 - Karl Dönitz, German navy officer (d. 1980) - Hand picked successor to Adolf Hitler as Führer of Germany. - Got to clean up the mess.

To learn more about the above topics check out the following books from the Library's collection:


Amazon Says: On a September day in 1920, an angry Italian anarchist named Mario Budaexploded a horse-drawn wagon filled with dynamite and iron scrap nearNew York’s Wall Street, killing 4 more...
Amazon Says: On a September day in 1920, an angry Italian anarchist named Mario Budaexploded a horse-drawn wagon filled with dynamite and iron scrap nearNew York’s Wall Street, killing 40 people. Since Buda’s prototype thecar bomb has evolved into a “poor man’s air force,” a generic weapon ofmass destruction that now craters cities from Bombay to Oklahoma City. In this brilliant and disturbing history, Mike Davis traces itsworldwide use and development, in the process exposing the role ofstate intelligence agencies—particularly those of the United States,Israel, India, and Pakistan—in globalizing urban terrorist techniques.Davis argues that it is the incessant impact of car bombs, rather thanthe more apocalyptic threats of nuclear or bio-terrorism, that ischanging cities and urban lifestyles, as privileged centers of powerincreasingly surround themselves with “rings of steel” against a weaponthat nevertheless seems impossible to defeat. less...
Amazon

The Mexican Wars for Independence by Timothy J. Henderson
Amazon Says: Mexico’s wars for independence were not fought to achieve political independence. Unlike their neighbors to the north, Mexico’s revolutionaries aimed to overhaul their soc more...
Amazon Says: Mexico’s wars for independence were not fought to achieve political independence. Unlike their neighbors to the north, Mexico’s revolutionaries aimed to overhaul their society. Intending profound social reform, the rebellion’s leaders declared from the onset that their struggle would be incomplete, even meaningless, if it were merely a political event. Easily navigating through nineteenth-century Mexico’s complex and volatile political environment, Timothy J. Henderson offers a well-rounded treatment of the entire period, but pays particular attention to the early phases of the revolt under the priests Miguel Hidalgo and José María Morelos. Hidalgo promised an immediate end to slavery and tailored his appeals to the poor, but also sanctioned pillage and shocking acts of violence. This savagery would ultimately cost Hidalgo, Morelos, and the entire country dearly, leading to the revolution’s failure in pursuit of both meaningful social and political reform. While Mexico eventually gained independence from Spain, severe social injustices remained and would fester for another century. Henderson deftly traces the major leaders and conflicts, forcing us to reconsider what “independence” meant and means for Mexico today. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: Napoleon's invasion of Russia and his ensuing terrible retreat from Moscow played out as military epic and human tragedy on a colossal scale -- history's first example of tota more...
Amazon Says: Napoleon's invasion of Russia and his ensuing terrible retreat from Moscow played out as military epic and human tragedy on a colossal scale -- history's first example of total war. The story begins in 1811, when Napoleon dominated nearly all of Europe, succeeding in his aim to reign over the civilized world like a modern-day Charlemagne. Part of his bid for supremacy involved destroying Britain through a continental blockade, but the plan was stymied when Russia's Tsar Alexander refused to comply. So he set out to teach the Tsar a lesson by intimidation and force. What followed was a deadly battle that would change the fate of modern Europe.By invading Russia in 1812, Napoleon was upping the ante as never before. Once he sent his vast army eastward, there was no turning back: he was sucked farther and farther into the one territory he could not conquer. Trudging through a brutal climate in hostile lands, his men marched on toward distant Moscow. But this only galvanized the Russians, who finally made a stand at the gates of the city. The ensuing outbreak was a slaughter the likes of which would not be seen again until the first day of the Somme more than a century later.What remained of Napoleon's army now had to endure a miserable retreat across the wintry wastes of Russia, while his enemies aligned against him. This turned out to be a momentous turning point: not only the beginning of the end for Napoleon's empire, but the rise of Russia's influence in world affairs. It also gave birth to Napoleon's superhuman legend -- the myth of greatness in failure that would inspire the Romantic poets as well as future leaders to defy fate as he had done.In this gripping, authoritative account, Adam Zamoyski has drawn on the latest Russian research, as well as a vast pool of firsthand accounts in French, Russian, German, Polish, and Italian, to paint a vivid picture of the experiences of soldiers and civilians on both sides of the conflict. He shows how the relationship between Napoleon and Tsar Alexander came to distort their alliance and bring about a war that neither man wanted. Dramatic, insightful, and enormously absorbing, Moscow 1812 is a masterful work of history. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: On Sunday, September 6, 1970, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) hijacked four airliners bound from Europe for New York.  One, a brand new Pan Am 747, w more...
Amazon Says: On Sunday, September 6, 1970, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) hijacked four airliners bound from Europe for New York.  One, a brand new Pan Am 747, was taken to Cairo and blown up only seconds after its passengers escaped.  The attempt to hijack a second plane, an El Al flight, was foiled and the plane landed safely in the UK.  Two other planes, one TWA and one Swissair, were directed to the desert floor thirty-five miles northeast of Amman, Jordan, where a twenty-five day hostage drama began.  With the additional hijacking of a British airliner, over four hundred and fifty hostages had landed in the Jordanian desert. David Raab was on the TWA flight with his mother and siblings but was separated from them and taken to a refugee camp and then to an apartment in Amman where he was held hostage through a civil war. This is his story. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: Gaines provides an absorbing account of the Cherokees' involvement in the early years of the Civil War, focusing in particular on the actions of one group, John Drew's Regimen more...
Amazon Says: Gaines provides an absorbing account of the Cherokees' involvement in the early years of the Civil War, focusing in particular on the actions of one group, John Drew's Regiment of Mounted Rifles. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: No one questions the horrific impact of the Civil War on America, but few realize its effect on American Indians. Residents of Indian Territory found the war especially devast more...
Amazon Says: No one questions the horrific impact of the Civil War on America, but few realize its effect on American Indians. Residents of Indian Territory found the war especially devastating. Their homeland was beset not only by regular army operations but also by guerillas and bushwhackers. Complicating the situation even further, Cherokee men fought for the Union as well as the Confederacy and created their own “brothers’ war.”This book offers a broad overview of the war as it affected the Cherokees—a social history of a people plunged into crisis. The Cherokee Nation in the Civil War shows how the Cherokee people, who had only just begun to recover from the ordeal of removal, faced an equally devastating upheaval in the Civil War. Clarissa W. Confer illustrates how the Cherokee Nation, with its sovereign status and distinct culture, had a wartime experience unlike that of any other group of people—and suffered perhaps the greatest losses of land, population, and sovereignty.Confer examines decision-making and leadership within the tribe, campaigns and soldiering among participants on both sides, and elements of civilian life and reconstruction. She reveals how a centuries-old culture informed the Cherokees’ choices, with influences as varied as matrilineal descent, clan affiliations, economic distribution, and decentralized government combining to distinguish the Native reaction to the war.The Cherokee Nation in the Civil War recalls a people enduring years of hardship while also struggling for their future as the white man’s war encroached on the physical and political integrity of their nation.  less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: No guidebook existed for my route; no one had ever done it before", writes Tayler. As the first American to visit many of the places he goes, his reports on a country in trans more...
Amazon Says: No guidebook existed for my route; no one had ever done it before", writes Tayler. As the first American to visit many of the places he goes, his reports on a country in transition are timely and unforgettable. It is also the account of one man's love for a fragile, desperately troubled country. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: "From boyhood," wrote Francis Parkman, "I had a taste for the woods and the Indians." His lifelong fascination with these American subjects are brilliantly recorded in "The Or more...
Amazon Says: "From boyhood," wrote Francis Parkman, "I had a taste for the woods and the Indians." His lifelong fascination with these American subjects are brilliantly recorded in "The Oregon Trail" and "The Conspiracy of Pontiac," his two earliest works. Parkman began his travels to the northern wilderness during his student years at Harvard in the 1840s, then went west after graduation. His first and most famous book, "The Oregon Trail," is a vivid account of his adventures on the open frontier and his encounters with Plains Indians in their last era of free, nomadic life. "The Conspiracy of Pontiac and the Indian War after the Conquest of Canada," Parkman's first historical work, portrays the fierce conflict that erupted along the Great Lakes in the aftermath of the Seven Years' War and chronicles the defeats in which both the eastern Indians and their forest "received their final doom." less...
Amazon

Donitz: The Last Fuhrer by Peter Padfield
Amazon Says: Grand Admiral Karl Dönitz was a major military commander in the Second World War. His name will always be associated with his attempt to cut Britain’s supply lines with U-b more...
Amazon Says: Grand Admiral Karl Dönitz was a major military commander in the Second World War. His name will always be associated with his attempt to cut Britain’s supply lines with U-boats deployed in mass ‘pack’ attacks on convoys in the Atlantic. Research in the German naval archives has allowed Peter Padfield to describe the evolution of the strategy and the demands Dönitz placed on his commanders and crews. Triumphant in the early war years, Allied countermeasures eventually turned the tables and the hunters became the hunted. Yet, as the life expectancy of U-boat men on operations fell to a matter of weeks Dönitz continued to send out his young men to probable violent death. Just why is the theme of this book: far more than a study of war at sea, it is a portrait of a sensitive officer who proved his ability as a U-boat commander in the First World War and preserved an ice-cold leadership veneer, yet was personally insecure and a fantasist in need of a cause to serve. He found it in the person of Adolf Hitler. An early convert to Nazism – contrary to the non-political image of him constructed by his peers after the lost war – he followed the Führer with blind fanaticism to the end. Rewarded by promotion to Commander-in-Chief of the German navy, finally Hitler appointed him his successor, and he became the last Führer of the Third Reich. This is the story of a personal tragedy played out within the greater tragedy of a nation. ‘Peter Padfield’s compellingly readable book conveys a flavour of Nazi leadership unmatched by anything outside the memoirs of Albert Speer. It is difficult to frame higher praise.’ John Keegan, The Sunday Times ‘He stalks his quarry with the patience of a U-boat commander, seeing through his camouflage and, finally, sinking him.’ Tom Pocock, Evening Standard ‘Peter Padfield has dropped a pattern of depth charges plumb on top of the image of Dönitz…the markedly different story now unfolded has the ring of truth…[in] this fully-documented and well-written book.’ Admiral Sir Ian McGeoch, The Times ‘A major work of scholarship by a writer whose thinking is not locked into the rigid limits of establishment or service loyalty.’ Lloyd’s List ‘Mr Padfield explains with brilliant clarity the Germany in which Dönitz grew up…The story of the war is told as Dönitz saw it – a unique, sharp viewpoint. Here are the great convoy battles, the political feuds and manouevering, the initial successes, the turning of the tide…it is a tremendous story and it rolls along like a great Atlantic wave.’ John Winton, The Naval Review ‘A fascinating story…’ Times Literary Supplement ‘Deeply researched and well-written…’ Gordon Brook-Shepherd, The Sunday Telegraph ‘…an important book…The psychological quirks and complexities of a man of obvious emotional sensitivity starved of affection and forced into an authoritarian mould are well brought out…highly recommended.’ The Mariner’s Mirror ‘…a grimly fascinating biography…’ Reid Beddow, The Washington Post ‘…well-written biography…we are shown Dönitz’s genius as well as his shortcomings.’ Norman Polmar, New York Times ‘exceptionally fine biography…’ U.S. Publishers’ Weekly ‘Le magnifique travail de l’historien anglais Peter Padfield…’ L’Express, Paris less...
Amazon
Print

Comment about this page...