Too Big to Jail - How Prosecutors Compromise with Corporations | Richland Library Skip to content
Too Big to Jail, by Brandon Garrett

Too Big to Jail - How Prosecutors Compromise with Corporations

Brandon Garrett discusses the way American courts routinely hand down harsh sentences to individuals but apply a different standard of justice to corporations in Too Big to Jail.

Too Big to Jail "takes readers into a complex, compromised world of backroom deals for an unprecedented look at what happens when criminal charges are brought against a major company." The author relates that "many companies pay no criminal fine", that "blockbuster payments are often greatly reduced" and that "high level employees tend to get off scot-free." The author's objective is to describe "concrete ways to improve corporate law enforcement by insisting on more stringent prosecution agreements, ongoing judicial review, and greater transparency."

Check out this book and others like it, in Richland Library's collection, that explain how companies described as "too big to fail" are often also "too big to jail".


Amazon Says: Taking readers into a complex, compromised world of backroom deals, this unprecedented look at what really happens when criminal charges are brought against a major company in more...
Amazon Says: Taking readers into a complex, compromised world of backroom deals, this unprecedented look at what really happens when criminal charges are brought against a major company in the United States presents data from more than a decade of federal cases that reveals of pattern of negotiation and settlement. less...
Amazon

Flash Boys by Michael Lewis
Amazon Says: In Michael Lewis's game-changing bestseller, a small group of Wall Street iconoclasts realize that the U.S. stock market has been rigged for the benefit of insiders. They band more...
Amazon Says: In Michael Lewis's game-changing bestseller, a small group of Wall Street iconoclasts realize that the U.S. stock market has been rigged for the benefit of insiders. They band together-some of them walking away from seven-figure salaries-to investigate, expose, and reform the insidious new ways that Wall Street generates profits. If you have any contact with the market, even a retirement account, this story is happening to you. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: 13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown by James Kwak. Pantheon Books,2010 more...
Amazon Says: 13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown by James Kwak. Pantheon Books,2010 less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: A real-life thriller about the most tumultuous period in America’s financial history by an acclaimed New York Times Reporter Andrew Ross Sorkin delivers the first t more...
Amazon Says: A real-life thriller about the most tumultuous period in America’s financial history by an acclaimed New York Times Reporter Andrew Ross Sorkin delivers the first true behind-the-scenes, moment-by-moment account of how the greatest financial crisis since the Great Depression developed into a global tsunami. From inside the corner office at Lehman Brothers to secret meetings in South Korea, and the corridors of Washington, Too Big to Fail is the definitive story of the most powerful men and women in finance and politics grappling with success and failure, ego and greed, and, ultimately, the fate of the world’s economy. “We’ve got to get some foam down on the runway!” a sleepless Timothy Geithner, the then-president of the Federal Reserve of New York, would tell Henry M. Paulson, the Treasury secretary, about the catastrophic crash the world’s financial system would experience. Through unprecedented access to the players involved, Too Big to Fail re-creates all the drama and turmoil, revealing never disclosed details and elucidating how decisions made on Wall Street over the past decade sowed the seeds of the debacle. This true story is not just a look at banks that were “too big to fail,” it is a real-life thriller with a cast of bold-faced names who themselves thought they were too big to fail. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: A groundbreaking book that challenges Americans to reevaluate our views on how a new and more sophisticated style of corruption and private interests have infiltrated every le more...
Amazon Says: A groundbreaking book that challenges Americans to reevaluate our views on how a new and more sophisticated style of corruption and private interests have infiltrated every level of society.From the Tea Party to Occupy Wall Street, however divergent their political views, these groups seem united by one thing: outrage over a system of power and influence that they feel has stolen their livelihoods and liberties. Increasingly, protesters on both ends of the political spectrum and the media are using the word “corrupt” to describe an elusory system of power that has shed any accountability to those it was meant to help and govern. But what does corruption and unaccountability mean in today’s world? It is far more toxic and deeply rooted than bribery. Advisors, strategists and other private contractors, which make up an ever-increasing share of the government, act in the best interests of their company, versus beholden to the tax payer.  Foreign governments with a history of human rights violations, military coups, and more, hire American public relation firms to suppress reports and search results for their crimes.  Investigative journalism has been replaced by "truthiness."  From Super PACs pouring secret money into our election system, to companies buying better ratings from Standard & Poors, or the extreme influence of lobbyists in congress, all are embody a “new corruption” and remain unaccountable to our society’s supposed watchdogs, which sit idly alongside the same groups that have brought the government, business and much of the military in to their pocket.  less...
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