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Book Talk with Author Katherine Mellen Charron on March 22nd

Join us at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, March 22, 2013, as Katherine Mellen Charron, author and associate professor of history at North Carolina State University discusses Freedom’s Teacher: The Life of Septima Clark.

Charron gives an exhaustive look at the life of Septima Clark, a South Carolina educator and civil rights activist. Clark was born in 1898 in Charleston to Peter Porter Poinsette, a former slave, and Victoria Anderson, a freeborn African American. In 1916, Clark graduated from Avery Institute and went on to teach on Johns Island and in public schools in Columbia, South Carolina as well as Ohio and North Carolina. As a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Clark worked to equalize teacher salaries in public schools.

Learn more about Charron’s research and many more of Septima Clark’s contributions to civil rights activism at the Richland Library on March 22, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the Bostick Auditorium. The event is being held in partnership with the University of South Carolina’s School of Journalism and Mass Communications as part of their Media & Civil Rights History Symposium. A book signing will follow.

Contact Crystal at 929-3400 for more information.


Crystal J. Says: Can I Get a Witness?: Prophetic Religious Voices of African American Women: An Anthology edited by Marcia Y. Riggs
Amazon Says: Book by Marcia Y. Riggs more...
Amazon Says: Book by Marcia Y. Riggs less...
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Crystal J. Says: Freedom's Teacher: The Life of Septima Clark by Katherine Mellen Charron
Amazon Says: In the mid-1950s, Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987), a former public school teacher, developed a citizenship training program that enabled thousands of African Americans to more...
Amazon Says: In the mid-1950s, Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987), a former public school teacher, developed a citizenship training program that enabled thousands of African Americans to register to vote and then to link the power of the ballot to concrete strategies for individual and communal empowerment. In this vibrantly written biography, Katherine Charron demonstrates Clark's crucial role--and the role of many black women teachers--in making education a cornerstone of the twentieth-century freedom struggle. Using Clark's life as a lens, Charron sheds valuable new light on southern black women's activism in national, state, and judicial politics, from the Progressive Era to the civil rights movement and beyond. less...
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Crystal J. Says: Groundwork: Local Black Freedom Movements in America edited by Jeanne Theoharis and Komozi Woodard ; with a foreword by Charles Payne
Amazon Says: Over the last several years, the traditional narrative of the civil rights movement as largely a southern phenomenon, organized primarily by male leaders, that roughly began w more...
Amazon Says: Over the last several years, the traditional narrative of the civil rights movement as largely a southern phenomenon, organized primarily by male leaders, that roughly began with the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and ended with the Voting Rights Act of 1965, has been complicated by studies that root the movement in smaller communities across the country. These local movements had varying agendas and organizational development, geared to the particular circumstances, resources, and regions in which they operated. Local civil rights activists frequently worked in tandem with the national civil rights movement but often functioned autonomously from—and sometimes even at odds with—the national movement.Together, the pathbreaking essays in Groundwork teach us that local civil rights activity was a vibrant component of the larger civil rights movement, and contributed greatly to its national successes. Individually, the pieces offer dramatic new insights about the civil rights movement, such as the fact that a militant black youth organization in Milwaukee was led by a white Catholic priest and in Cambridge, Maryland, by a middle-aged black woman; that a group of middle-class, professional black women spearheaded Jackson, Mississippi's movement for racial justice and made possible the continuation of the Freedom Rides, and that, despite protests from national headquarters, the Brooklyn chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality staged a dramatic act of civil disobedience at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York.No previous volume has enabled readers to examine several different local movements together, and in so doing, Groundwork forges a far more comprehensive vision of the black freedom movement. less...
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Crystal J. Says: More Than Petticoats: Remarkable South Carolina Women by Lee Davis Perry
Amazon Says: More than Petticoats: Remarkable South Carolina Women celebrates the women who shaped the Palmetto State. Short, illuminating biographies and archival photographs and painting more...
Amazon Says: More than Petticoats: Remarkable South Carolina Women celebrates the women who shaped the Palmetto State. Short, illuminating biographies and archival photographs and paintings tell the stories of women from across the state who served as teachers, writers, entrepreneurs, and artists. less...
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Crystal J. Says: Sisters in the Struggle: African American Women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement edited by Bettye Collier-Thomas and V.P. Franklin
Amazon Says: Women were at the forefront of the civil rights struggle, but their indvidiual stories were rarely heard. Only recently have historians begun to recognize the central role wom more...
Amazon Says: Women were at the forefront of the civil rights struggle, but their indvidiual stories were rarely heard. Only recently have historians begun to recognize the central role women played in the battle for racial equality. In Sisters in the Struggle, we hear about the unsung heroes of the civil rights movements such as Ella Baker, who helped found the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Fannie Lou Hamer, a sharecropper who took on segregation in the Democratic party (and won), and Septima Clark, who created a network of "Citizenship Schools" to teach poor Black men and women to read and write and help them to register to vote. We learn of Black women's activism in the Black Panther Party where they fought the police, as well as the entrenched male leadership, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, where the behind-the-scenes work of women kept the organization afloat when it was under siege. It also includes first-person testimonials from the women who made headlines with their courageous resistance to segregation—Rosa Parks, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, and Dorothy Height. This collection represents the coming of age of African-American women's history and presents new stories that point the way to future study. Contributors: Bettye Collier-Thomas, Vicki Crawford, Cynthia Griggs Fleming, V. P. Franklin, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Farah Jasmine Griffin, Duchess Harris, Sharon Harley, Dorothy I. Height, Chana Kai Lee, Tracye Matthews, Genna Rae McNeil, Rosa Parks, Barbara Ransby, Jacqueline A. Rouse, Elaine Moore Smith, and Linda Faye Williams. less...
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Crystal J. Says: Women of Hope: African Americans who Made a difference by Joyce Hansen
Amazon Says: Features photographs and biographies of thirteen African-American women, including Maya Angelou, Ruby Dee, and Alice Walker. more...
Amazon Says: Features photographs and biographies of thirteen African-American women, including Maya Angelou, Ruby Dee, and Alice Walker. less...
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