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Resumes: Why Objective Statements are Becoming Obsolete

OBJECTIVE STATEMENT VS. PROFILE

The objective statement is a reoccurring stumbling block for job seekers who are creating their resumes. They fear that their statement is too broad or too specific. Which results in an objective statement that sounds something like the following "Seeking challenging position that will utilize my skills and abilities and give me some experience for a future career." This type of statement is a waste of space, positioned in the most important place on your resume. Objective statements focus on what the job seeker is looking for in a job and not what skills and experiences the employer is looking for in an employee. In an economy where jobs are hard to come by and employers often sift through 50 or more resumes to fill a position, job seekers must market their benefits by using a profile.

PROFILE A profile is 2 to 3 opening statements that highlight your best knowledge, skills, abilities, experiences and most desirable qualities. The profile is located below your contact information, which is found at the top of your resume. The profile should be directed toward what the potential employer wants in an employee and what you can deliver. For example, a well written profile statement might read, "Dedicated Sales Manager with over 10 years of training and supervisory experience." Since every employer is looking for different skills and experiences in their employees, job seekers must customize their profiles for each job they apply for. The profile is the first and most important thing on your resume, for this reason it is vital that job seekers take the time to think about what skills and experiences they have to offer an employer.

WHAT EMPLOYERS ARE LOOKING FOR When applying for different postions you should always focus on the job description, in order to determine how your skills and/or experiences match up with what the potential employer is looking for. Some common skills and traits that employers are looking for include the following: Communication Skills (Written, Verbal and Listening), Work Ethics and Personal Values (Honest, Dependable, Reliable and Self-Motivated), Interpersonal Skills (Customer Service, Works Well in Diverse Poplulations), Teamwork, Analytical Skills (Troubleshooter Who Provides Innovative Solutions) and Initiative (Productive and Fast Learner)

BE SPECIFIC When possible quanitify and qualify your profile statement . For example, a sale's manager's profile could include the following, "Developed and initiated a sales incentive program in 9 locations that increased sales by 25 %." A receptionist's profile might include "High Energy Receptionist, with excellent customer service and computer skills who assists over 100 customers daily. Employers are always interested in their bottom line, which means they want to know how much money you can make them or save them.

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Chris B. Says: 101 Great Resumes includes a large number of profile geared resumes, for a wide variety of jobs.
Amazon Says: In 101 Great Resumes, you will find the resume format that will work wonders for you, one that can showcase your unique background, situation and career goals and help you lan more...
Amazon Says: In 101 Great Resumes, you will find the resume format that will work wonders for you, one that can showcase your unique background, situation and career goals and help you land your dream job. It features resumes tailored to the individual situations, challenges, and aspirations of today's job seekers. less...
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