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Today in History News Report

Headlining todays news we congratulate Boris Godunov who was named Czar of Russia (1598). Of Tartar descent he has announced that he we will try to improve trade relations with other European nations, especially England. Internally he is expected to push for reforms that change the manner in which Serfs are managed, tieing them to the land they worked and not their overlord. Slavery by any other name is still slavery.
Word from Italy (1610) is that Galileo Galilei has observed four 'stars' (Galilean moons: Ganymede, Callisto, Io and Europa) orbiting the planet Jupiter. This counters the theory that everything orbits around the Earth. Better break the news to the Vatican gently.
Returning to Russia, bad news concerning their dispute with neighboring Finland (1940). We are receiving news that the Finnish 9th Division has and completely destroyed the overwhelming Soviet forces that had invaded the country on the Raate-Suomussalmi road. The news has been favorably received worldwide due to the outcry denouncing the invasion. Germany is said to be taking special note of the Finnish success against the much larger Soviet forces.
General Bernard Montgomery ruffled some feathers today (1945) in a press conference when he took credit for the Allied victory in the Battle of the Bulge. George Patton and the Screaming Eagles of the 101st Airborne Division don't exactly see it the same way.
Sad news in Kentucky (1948) where a Kentucky Air National Guard pilot, Thomas Mantell, was killed when his P-51 Mustang Fighter Plane crashed while in pursuit of a UFO. Maybe there's something to these things after all.
The power struggle between the two Communist controlled countries (1979) came to an end today when Vietnamese forces captured Cambodian capitol Phnom Penh. The victory brought down Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge government. Commies killing Commies, John Birch's ultimate fantasy.
Tourists visiting Pisa will be disappointed when they learn that the interior of the Leaning Tower of Pisa is closed to the public (1990) due of safety concerns. Guess being disappointed is better than being inside and having it fall over.
Today's birthdays:
1718 - Israel Putnam - Revolutionary War General - Hero of Bunker Hill but you probably didn't know his name.
1800 - Millard Fillmore - 13th President
1912 - Charles Addams, Cartoonist - He must have had some crazy nightmares.
On a lighter note. Today we honor the people who are the backbone of today's society. It’s International Programmers’ Day! We celebrate the people who create the software behind our favorite websites, digital gadgets, appliances, and vehicles. Programmers (also known as developers or software engineers) write the code that runs our computers. There are many different types of computer languages and most programmers specialize in one of these. Facebook, for example, is primarily built using “PHP,” while Punchbowl uses “Ruby.” Although women hold only 25% of all professional IT jobs in the U.S., the first programmer in history was a British countess named Ada Lovelace. She was a mathematician and wrote the first algorithm intended for a computer. (Punchbowl.com)
It is also National Tempura Day! Tempura is a delicious deep fried Japanese dish made with lightly battered vegetables and seafood. The original cooking technique is actually attributed to the Portuguese, who landed in Japan in the sixteenth century to establish new trade routes. The word “tempura” is also related to the European roots of the dish. It comes from the Latin phrase “quattuor tempora” meaning “Ember Days.” This term refers to the days when Catholics eat fish or vegetables instead of meat. Tempura batter is made with cold water and wheat flour. Some recipes also call for eggs, baking soda, oil, or spices for extra flavoring. A traditional tempura will usually include shrimp, scallops, eggplant, green beans, sweet potato, mushrooms, or bamboo. (Punchbowl.com)

Boris Godounov by Alexander Pushkin
Ron S. Says: Learn history through a famous play
Amazon Says: This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that we more...
Amazon Says: This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. less...
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Ron S. Says: The man was a genius but had to hide a lot of his discoveries because he would declared to be a heritic. Learn more about this brave man.
Amazon Says: Galileo's trial by the Inquisition is one of the most dramatic incidents in the history of science and religion. Today, we tend to see this event in black and white--Galileo a more...
Amazon Says: Galileo's trial by the Inquisition is one of the most dramatic incidents in the history of science and religion. Today, we tend to see this event in black and white--Galileo all white, the Church all black. Galileo in Rome presents a much more nuanced account of Galileo's relationship with Rome. The book offers a fascinating account of the six trips Galileo made to Rome, from his first visit at age 23, as an unemployed mathematician, to his final fateful journey to face the Inquisition. The authors reveal why the theory that the Earth revolves around the Sun, set forth in Galileo's Dialogue, stirred a hornet's nest of theological issues, and they argue that, despite these issues, the Church might have accepted Copernicus if there had been solid proof. More interesting, they show how Galileo dug his own grave. To get the imprimatur, he brought political pressure to bear on the Roman Censor. He disobeyed a Church order not to teach the heliocentric theory. And he had a character named Simplicio (which in Italian sounds like simpleton) raise the same objections to heliocentrism that the Pope had raised with Galileo. The authors show that throughout the trial, until the final sentence and abjuration, the Church treated Galileo with great deference, and once he was declared guilty commuted his sentence to house arrest. Here then is a unique look at the life of Galileo as well as a strikingly different view of an event that has come to epitomize the Church's supposed antagonism toward science. less...
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Ron S. Says: UFO's Do they exist? Read and you be the judge.
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Ron S. Says: So unpopular they had to lump him in with Zachary Taylor
Amazon Says: In this book Elbert B. Smith disagrees sharply with traditional interpretations of Taylor and Fillmore, the twelfth and thirteenth presidents (from 1848 to 1853). He argues pe more...
Amazon Says: In this book Elbert B. Smith disagrees sharply with traditional interpretations of Taylor and Fillmore, the twelfth and thirteenth presidents (from 1848 to 1853). He argues persuasively that the slaveholding Taylor—and not John C. Calhoun—was the realistic defender of southern slaveholding interests, and that Taylor did nothing to impede the Compromise of 1850. While Taylor opposed the combination of the issues into a single compromise bill that could not be passed without amendments to suit the extremists, he would have approved the different parts of the Compromise that were ultimately passed as separate measures. Most historians have written that Taylor's death and Fillmore's accession led to an abrupt change in presidential policy, but Smith believes that continuity predominated. Taylor wanted the controversies debated and acted upon as separate bills. Fillmore helped to accomplish this. Taylor was ready to defend New Mexico against Texas. Fillmore ordered 750 additional troops to New Mexico and announced publicly that he would do the same. Taylor had wanted statehood for California and New Mexico with self-determination on slavery. As separate measures, the Congress admitted California and preserved a viable New Mexico as a territory authorized to make its own decision on slavery. With secessionists pitted against moderates in the southern elections of 1851, Fillmore had to choose between his constitutional oath and his personal antipathy to the new fugitive slave law. He supported the law and thereby helped keep southern moderates in power for a few more years. In fact, however, his efforts did not recapture a single slave. In Smith's view, Fillmore's most serious mistake was refusing in 1852 to get himself nominated for another term. Smith argues that Taylor and Fillmore have been seriously misrepresented and underrated. They faced a terrible national crisis and accepted every responsibility without flinching or directing blame toward anyone else. less...
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Ron S. Says: Check this out along with our extensive cook book collection.
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