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Today in History News Report

Headlining todays news we congratulate Boris Godunov who was named Czar of Russia (1598). Of Tartar descent he has announced that he we will try to improve trade relations with other European nations, especially England. Internally he is expected to push for reforms that change the manner in which Serfs are managed, tieing them to the land they worked and not their overlord. Slavery by any other name is still slavery.
Word from Italy (1610) is that Galileo Galilei has observed four 'stars' (Galilean moons: Ganymede, Callisto, Io and Europa) orbiting the planet Jupiter. This counters the theory that everything orbits around the Earth. Better break the news to the Vatican gently.
Returning to Russia, bad news concerning their dispute with neighboring Finland (1940). We are receiving news that the Finnish 9th Division has and completely destroyed the overwhelming Soviet forces that had invaded the country on the Raate-Suomussalmi road. The news has been favorably received worldwide due to the outcry denouncing the invasion. Germany is said to be taking special note of the Finnish success against the much larger Soviet forces.
General Bernard Montgomery ruffled some feathers today (1945) in a press conference when he took credit for the Allied victory in the Battle of the Bulge. George Patton and the Screaming Eagles of the 101st Airborne Division don't exactly see it the same way.
Sad news in Kentucky (1948) where a Kentucky Air National Guard pilot, Thomas Mantell, was killed when his P-51 Mustang Fighter Plane crashed while in pursuit of a UFO. Maybe there's something to these things after all.
The power struggle between the two Communist controlled countries (1979) came to an end today when Vietnamese forces captured Cambodian capitol Phnom Penh. The victory brought down Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge government. Commies killing Commies, John Birch's ultimate fantasy.
Tourists visiting Pisa will be disappointed when they learn that the interior of the Leaning Tower of Pisa is closed to the public (1990) due of safety concerns. Guess being disappointed is better than being inside and having it fall over.
Today's birthdays:
1718 - Israel Putnam - Revolutionary War General - Hero of Bunker Hill but you probably didn't know his name.
1800 - Millard Fillmore - 13th President
1912 - Charles Addams, Cartoonist - He must have had some crazy nightmares.
On a lighter note. Today we honor the people who are the backbone of today's society. It’s International Programmers’ Day! We celebrate the people who create the software behind our favorite websites, digital gadgets, appliances, and vehicles. Programmers (also known as developers or software engineers) write the code that runs our computers. There are many different types of computer languages and most programmers specialize in one of these. Facebook, for example, is primarily built using “PHP,” while Punchbowl uses “Ruby.” Although women hold only 25% of all professional IT jobs in the U.S., the first programmer in history was a British countess named Ada Lovelace. She was a mathematician and wrote the first algorithm intended for a computer. (Punchbowl.com)
It is also National Tempura Day! Tempura is a delicious deep fried Japanese dish made with lightly battered vegetables and seafood. The original cooking technique is actually attributed to the Portuguese, who landed in Japan in the sixteenth century to establish new trade routes. The word “tempura” is also related to the European roots of the dish. It comes from the Latin phrase “quattuor tempora” meaning “Ember Days.” This term refers to the days when Catholics eat fish or vegetables instead of meat. Tempura batter is made with cold water and wheat flour. Some recipes also call for eggs, baking soda, oil, or spices for extra flavoring. A traditional tempura will usually include shrimp, scallops, eggplant, green beans, sweet potato, mushrooms, or bamboo. (Punchbowl.com)

Boris Godounov by Alexander Pushkin
Ron S. Says: Learn history through a famous play
Amazon Says: This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the more...
Amazon Says: This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant. less...
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Ron S. Says: The man was a genius but had to hide a lot of his discoveries because he would declared to be a heritic. Learn more about this brave man.
Amazon Says: Galileo's trial by the Inquisition is one of the most dramatic incidents in the history of science and religion. Today, we tend to see this event in black and white--Galileo a more...
Amazon Says: Galileo's trial by the Inquisition is one of the most dramatic incidents in the history of science and religion. Today, we tend to see this event in black and white--Galileo all white, the Church all black. Galileo in Rome presents a much more nuanced account of Galileo's relationship with Rome. The book offers a fascinating account of the six trips Galileo made to Rome, from his first visit at age 23, as an unemployed mathematician, to his final fateful journey to face the Inquisition. The authors reveal why the theory that the Earth revolves around the Sun, set forth in Galileo's Dialogue, stirred a hornet's nest of theological issues, and they argue that, despite these issues, the Church might have accepted Copernicus if there had been solid proof. More interesting, they show how Galileo dug his own grave. To get the imprimatur, he brought political pressure to bear on the Roman Censor. He disobeyed a Church order not to teach the heliocentric theory. And he had a character named Simplicio (which in Italian sounds like simpleton) raise the same objections to heliocentrism that the Pope had raised with Galileo. The authors show that throughout the trial, until the final sentence and abjuration, the Church treated Galileo with great deference, and once he was declared guilty commuted his sentence to house arrest. Here then is a unique look at the life of Galileo as well as a strikingly different view of an event that has come to epitomize the Church's supposed antagonism toward science. less...
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Ron S. Says: Learn more about this little known war that greatly influenced the larger world war.
Amazon Says: At 10:30 A.M. on November 30, 1939, a formation of Russian bombers dropped from a cloud bank to unload a salvo of bombs on Helsinki, the capital city of Finland. The Winter Wa more...
Amazon Says: At 10:30 A.M. on November 30, 1939, a formation of Russian bombers dropped from a cloud bank to unload a salvo of bombs on Helsinki, the capital city of Finland. The Winter War was underway. Overwhelming superiority in manpower and weapons ultimately prevailed, but not before Finland had written a saga of heroic resistance. It is this too-seldom-remembered story that William R. Trotter recounts in Fire and Ice. 16 pages of photographs. less...
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Ron S. Says: Writen by a Brit so he thinks more highly of the man than I do, but still a good read.
Amazon Says: The best-selling author of JFK: Restless Youth provides an analytical portrait of British Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery, detailing his remarkable military achievements a more...
Amazon Says: The best-selling author of JFK: Restless Youth provides an analytical portrait of British Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery, detailing his remarkable military achievements and his difficult personality. 12,500 first printing. less...
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Ron S. Says: Still a lot to learn about this war that divided more than one country.
Amazon Says: "Informative and entertaining, but sobering...A first-rate collection of facts about weapons systems". -- "The New York Times Book Review" on "Dirty Little Secrets" " "Dirty L more...
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Ron S. Says: May want to see it before it falls
Amazon Says: Famed for its lean that has defied gravity since its inception over 800 years ago, this book chronicles what modern engineers consider to be the most flawed building still sta more...
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Ron S. Says: How many comics inspire a three television shows and four movies?
Amazon Says: “They’re creepy and they’re kooky,” is how the catchy theme song of The Addams Family described everyone’s favorite nonconformists–Morticia, Gomez, Lurch, Uncle Fe more...
Amazon Says: “They’re creepy and they’re kooky,” is how the catchy theme song of The Addams Family described everyone’s favorite nonconformists–Morticia, Gomez, Lurch, Uncle Fester, Grandmama, Wednesday, and Pugsley. But for all the novelty of the sitcom based on Charles Addams’s groundbreaking New Yorker cartoons, Hollywood’s Addams family paled beside the cartoonist’s. “Not half as evil as my original characters,” sighed Addams. Though the haunted-household cartoons developed a following among New Yorker readers long before the 1960s sitcom, and the Addams and their seedy Victorian mansion soon became recognizable types, the artist with the well-known signature “Chas Addams” remained an enigma. Called “the Bela Lugosi of the cartoonists,” Addams was the cartoonist everyone–even Hitchcock–wanted to meet. He was bedeviled by rumors. People claimed that he slept in a coffin, collected severed fingers sent by fans, and suffered bouts of madness that sent him to the insane asylum. The true Addams was even more fabulous than the wildest stories and cartoons. Here was a sunny, funny urbane man, “a normal American boy,” as he called himself, with a dog who hated children and a taste for crossbows. While producing a unique body of work featuring lovingly drawn homicidal spouses, demonic children, genteel monsters, and an everyday world crosshatched with magic, Addams raced classic sports cars, juggled beautiful women (Joan Fontaine, Jackie Kennedy, and Greta Garbo, to name a few), and charmed everyone. But though his pursuits suggest lighthearted romantic comedy, Addams’s life had its sinister side. Far darker than anything Addams created with a brush was his relationship with a dangerous woman who forever changed his life. In this first biography of the great cartoonist, written with exclusive access to Addams’s intimates and his private papers, we finally meet the man behind the famed cartoons and circling rumors. Here is his surprising childhood in New Jersey, the cartoon that offended the Nazis, the friend whose early death Addams long mourned. Here are his wives, the stories behind his most famous–and some of his most private–cartoons, and the Addams whom even his closest friends didn’t know. With wit, humor, poignancy, and insight–enhanced by rare family photographs, classic and previously unpublished cartoons, and private drawings–Linda H. Davis paints an engaging and endearing portrait of a marvelous American original. One of America’s most gifted biographers, Linda Davis has given us an engrossing, unforgettable portrait of the legendary New Yorker cartoonist. In Davis’s empathetic narrative and in accompanying cartoons, photographs, and drawings, the great artist lives again in all his eccentric brilliance, ghoulish sense of humor, fecund love life, and warm and gentle humanity. Beautifully written and exhaustively researched, Chas Addams: A Cartoonist’s Life deserves to win every literary prize there is for best biography.--Stephen B. Oates, Paul Murray Kendall Professor of Biography and Professor History Emeritus, The University of Massachusetts at Amherst “If you don’t appreciate martinis with eyeballs in them, this is not the book for you. For the rest of us here is an irresistible riot of a read, an exhilarating expertly mixed cocktail of words and images. Charles Addams’s life was crowded with women–famous women, smart women, witty women, garden-variety drop-dead beautiful women–but in Linda Davis he has truly met his match.” --Stacy Schiff, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Vera “Seldom have we found as satisfying a fit of subject and author as this. Linda Davis has distilled years of research, travel and interviews into a rollicking and fascinating review of Addams’s astonishing life as artist, playboy and–from time to time–husband. We can all be grateful that Addams and Davis finally found one another.”--Harrison Kinney, author of James Thurber: His Life and Times less...
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Ron S. Says: Check this out along with our extensive cook book collection.
Amazon Says: Jame Ruth knows her pots and pans. And in this user-friendly cookbook full of useful information and delicious recipes, she demystifies the various shapes, sizes, materials, a more...
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