Skip to content

Today in History News Report

Headlining todays news we congratulate Boris Godunov who was named Czar of Russia (1598). Of Tartar descent he has announced that he we will try to improve trade relations with other European nations, especially England. Internally he is expected to push for reforms that change the manner in which Serfs are managed, tieing them to the land they worked and not their overlord. Slavery by any other name is still slavery.
Word from Italy (1610) is that Galileo Galilei has observed four 'stars' (Galilean moons: Ganymede, Callisto, Io and Europa) orbiting the planet Jupiter. This counters the theory that everything orbits around the Earth. Better break the news to the Vatican gently.
Returning to Russia, bad news concerning their dispute with neighboring Finland (1940). We are receiving news that the Finnish 9th Division has and completely destroyed the overwhelming Soviet forces that had invaded the country on the Raate-Suomussalmi road. The news has been favorably received worldwide due to the outcry denouncing the invasion. Germany is said to be taking special note of the Finnish success against the much larger Soviet forces.
General Bernard Montgomery ruffled some feathers today (1945) in a press conference when he took credit for the Allied victory in the Battle of the Bulge. George Patton and the Screaming Eagles of the 101st Airborne Division don't exactly see it the same way.
Sad news in Kentucky (1948) where a Kentucky Air National Guard pilot, Thomas Mantell, was killed when his P-51 Mustang Fighter Plane crashed while in pursuit of a UFO. Maybe there's something to these things after all.
The power struggle between the two Communist controlled countries (1979) came to an end today when Vietnamese forces captured Cambodian capitol Phnom Penh. The victory brought down Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge government. Commies killing Commies, John Birch's ultimate fantasy.
Tourists visiting Pisa will be disappointed when they learn that the interior of the Leaning Tower of Pisa is closed to the public (1990) due of safety concerns. Guess being disappointed is better than being inside and having it fall over.
Today's birthdays:
1718 - Israel Putnam - Revolutionary War General - Hero of Bunker Hill but you probably didn't know his name.
1800 - Millard Fillmore - 13th President
1912 - Charles Addams, Cartoonist - He must have had some crazy nightmares.
On a lighter note. Today we honor the people who are the backbone of today's society. It’s International Programmers’ Day! We celebrate the people who create the software behind our favorite websites, digital gadgets, appliances, and vehicles. Programmers (also known as developers or software engineers) write the code that runs our computers. There are many different types of computer languages and most programmers specialize in one of these. Facebook, for example, is primarily built using “PHP,” while Punchbowl uses “Ruby.” Although women hold only 25% of all professional IT jobs in the U.S., the first programmer in history was a British countess named Ada Lovelace. She was a mathematician and wrote the first algorithm intended for a computer. (Punchbowl.com)
It is also National Tempura Day! Tempura is a delicious deep fried Japanese dish made with lightly battered vegetables and seafood. The original cooking technique is actually attributed to the Portuguese, who landed in Japan in the sixteenth century to establish new trade routes. The word “tempura” is also related to the European roots of the dish. It comes from the Latin phrase “quattuor tempora” meaning “Ember Days.” This term refers to the days when Catholics eat fish or vegetables instead of meat. Tempura batter is made with cold water and wheat flour. Some recipes also call for eggs, baking soda, oil, or spices for extra flavoring. A traditional tempura will usually include shrimp, scallops, eggplant, green beans, sweet potato, mushrooms, or bamboo. (Punchbowl.com)

Boris Godounov by Alexander Pushkin
AmazonRon S. Says: Learn history through a famous play
Amazon Says: This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that we more...
Amazon Says: This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. less...
Amazon


AmazonRon S. Says: Learn more about this little known war that greatly influenced the larger world war.
Amazon Says: At 10:30 A.M. on November 30, 1939, a formation of Russian bombers dropped from a cloud bank to unload a salvo of bombs on Helsinki, the capital city of Finland. The Winter Wa more...
Amazon Says: At 10:30 A.M. on November 30, 1939, a formation of Russian bombers dropped from a cloud bank to unload a salvo of bombs on Helsinki, the capital city of Finland. The Winter War was underway. Overwhelming superiority in manpower and weapons ultimately prevailed, but not before Finland had written a saga of heroic resistance. It is this too-seldom-remembered story that William R. Trotter recounts in Fire and Ice. 16 pages of photographs. less...
Amazon


AmazonRon S. Says: Writen by a Brit so he thinks more highly of the man than I do, but still a good read.
Amazon Says: The best-selling author of JFK: Restless Youth provides an analytical portrait of British Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery, detailing his remarkable military achievements more...
Amazon Says: The best-selling author of JFK: Restless Youth provides an analytical portrait of British Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery, detailing his remarkable military achievements and his difficult personality. 12,500 first printing. less...
Amazon


AmazonRon S. Says: UFO's Do they exist? Read and you be the judge.
Amazon Says: With 200 entries in an A-to-Z format, The UFO Book is the most comprehensive and up-to-date source of its kind. One hundred photographs and drawings illustrate the allegedly r more...
Amazon Says: With 200 entries in an A-to-Z format, The UFO Book is the most comprehensive and up-to-date source of its kind. One hundred photographs and drawings illustrate the allegedly real and proven bogus evidence, helping readers decide for themselves whether or not extraterrestrials exist. less...
Amazon

AmazonRon S. Says: May want to see it before it falls
Amazon Says: Famed for its lean that has defied gravity since its inception over 800 years ago, this book chronicles what modern engineers consider to be the most flawed building still sta more...
Amazon Says: Famed for its lean that has defied gravity since its inception over 800 years ago, this book chronicles what modern engineers consider to be the most flawed building still standing today. Closed in 1990 due to fears of imminent collapse, a panel of world famous engineers have finally understood why it has been leaning and have solved the engineering problem of arresting any further lean and have stabilized this beautiful bell tower for future generations. less...
Amazon


AmazonRon S. Says: Learn about the battle that made the man famous
Amazon Says: Boston, 1775: A town occupied by General Thomas Gage's redcoats and groaning with Tory refugees from the Massachusetts countryside. Besieged for two months by a rabble in arms more...
Amazon Says: Boston, 1775: A town occupied by General Thomas Gage's redcoats and groaning with Tory refugees from the Massachusetts countryside. Besieged for two months by a rabble in arms, the British decided to break out of town. American spies discovered their plans, and on the night of June 16, 1775, a thousand rebels marched out onto Charlestown peninsula and began digging a redoubt (not on Bunker Hill, which they had been ordered to fortify, but on Breeds Hill, well within cannon shot of the British batteries and ships). At daybreak, HMS Lively began firing. It was the opening round of a battle that saw unbelievable heroism and tragic blunders on both sides (a battle that marked a point of no return for England and her colonies), the beginning of all-out war. less...
Amazon

Print

Comment about this page...