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The People in the Trees, by Hanya Yanagihara

2014 Dylan Thomas Prize Longlist

The longlist has been announced for the annual International Dylan Thomas Prize which "is one of the most prestigious awards for young writers, aimed at encouraging raw creative talent worldwide. It celebrates and nurtures international literary excellence across all genres and is open to novels, short stories, poetry and drama."

The £30,000 (about US$51,145) Prize is awarded to the best published or produced literary work in the English language, written by an author aged 39 or under. The shortlist will be announced in September and the winner will be unveiled in November.

Have you had a chance to read any of these great books yet? If not, give these young, and in some cases, debut authors, a read.

International Dylan Thomas Prize – longlist 2014 (* indicates titles not yet in the Richland Library collection)

At Night We Walk in Circles by Daniel Alarcón

The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton

The Pass by John Donnelly [Play]*

To Rise Again at a Decent Hour by Joshua Ferris

Elizabeth Is Missing by Emma Healey

The Gypsy Goddess by Meena Kandasamy*

A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing by Eimear McBride (due to publish September 9, 2014)

Snow in May by Kseniya Melnik

The Cartographer Tries to Map a Way to Zion by Kei Miller [Poetry]

The Orchard of Lost Souls by Nadifa Mohamed

Mametz by Owen Sheers [Play, based on Sheers’ poem]*

The Farm by Tom Rob Smith

The Girls from Corona del Mar by Rufi Thorpe

Mrs. Hemingway by Naomi Wood

The People in the Trees by Hanya Yanagihara

Past Dylan Thomas Prize Winners

  • 2006: Rachel Tresize, Fresh Apples
  • 2008: Nam Le, The Boat
  • 2010: Elyse Fenton, Clamor
  • 2011: Lucy Caldwell, The Meeting Point
  • 2012: Maggie Shipstead, Seating Arrangements
  • 2013: Claire Vaye Watkins, Battleborn

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    Amazon Says: NPR “Best Books of 2013” BookPage Best Books of 2013 Bookriot “Best Books of 2013” San Francisco Chronicle Favorite Books of 2013: Francisco Goldman Flavorwire 15 Favorite Novels of 2013 The breakout book from a prizewinning young writer: a breathtaking, suspenseful story of one man’s obsessive search to find the truth of another man’s downfall. Nelson’s life is not turning out the way he hoped. His girlfriend is sleeping with another man, his brother has left their South American country, leaving Nelson to care for their widowed mother, and his acting career can’t seem to get off the ground. That is, until he lands a starring role in a touring revival of The Idiot President, a legendary play by Nelson’s hero, Henry Nunez, leader of the storied guerrilla theater troupe Diciembre. And that’s when the real trouble begins. The tour takes Nelson out of the shelter of the city and across a landscape he’s never seen, which still bears the scars of the civil war. With each performance, Nelson grows closer to his fellow actors, becoming hopelessly entangled in their complicated lives, until, during one memorable performance, a long-buried betrayal surfaces to force the troupe into chaos. Nelson’s fate is slowly revealed through the investigation of the narrator, a young man obsessed with Nelson’s story—and perhaps closer to it than he lets on. In sharp, vivid, and beautiful prose, Alarcón delivers a compulsively readable narrative and a provocative meditation on fate, identity, and the large consequences that can result from even our smallest choices. less...
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    The Luminaries: A Novel by Eleanor Catton
    Amazon Says: The bestselling, Man Booker Prize-winning novel hailed as "a true achievement. Catton has built a lively parody of a 19th-century novel, and in so doing created a novel for th more...
    Amazon Says: The bestselling, Man Booker Prize-winning novel hailed as "a true achievement. Catton has built a lively parody of a 19th-century novel, and in so doing created a novel for the 21st, something utterly new. The pages fly."--New York Times Book Review It is 1866, and Walter Moody has come to stake his claim in New Zealand's booming gold rush. On the stormy night of his arrival, he stumbles across a tense gathering of 12 local men who have met in secret to discuss a series of unexplained events: a wealthy man has vanished, a prostitute has tried to end her life, and an enormous cache of gold has been discovered in the home of a luckless drunk. Moody is soon drawn into a network of fates and fortunes that is as complex and exquisitely ornate as the night sky. Richly evoking a mid-nineteenth-century world of shipping, banking, and gold rush boom and bust, THE LUMINARIES is at once a fiendishly clever ghost story, a gripping page-turner, and a thrilling novelistic achievement. It richly confirms that Eleanor Catton is one of the brightest stars in the international literary firmament. less...
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    Amazon Says: Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, this big, brilliant, profoundly observed novel by National Book Award Finalist Joshua Ferris explores the absurdities of modern life and more...
    Amazon Says: Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, this big, brilliant, profoundly observed novel by National Book Award Finalist Joshua Ferris explores the absurdities of modern life and one man's search for meaning. Paul O'Rourke is a man made of contradictions: he loves the world, but doesn't know how to live in it. He's a Luddite addicted to his iPhone, a dentist with a nicotine habit, a rabid Red Sox fan devastated by their victories, and an atheist not quite willing to let go of God. Then someone begins to impersonate Paul online, and he watches in horror as a website, a Facebook page, and a Twitter account are created in his name. What begins as an outrageous violation of his privacy soon becomes something more soul-frightening: the possibility that the online "Paul" might be a better version of the real thing. As Paul's quest to learn why his identity has been stolen deepens, he is forced to confront his troubled past and his uncertain future in a life disturbingly split between the real and the virtual. At once laugh-out-loud funny about the absurdities of the modern world, and indelibly profound about the eternal questions of the meaning of life, love and truth, TO RISE AGAIN AT A DECENT HOUR is a deeply moving and constantly surprising tour de force. less...
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    Elizabeth Is Missing by Emma Healey
    Amazon Says: In this darkly riveting debut novel—a sophisticated psychological mystery that is also an heartbreakingly honest meditation on memory, identity, and aging—an elderly woman more...
    Amazon Says: In this darkly riveting debut novel—a sophisticated psychological mystery that is also an heartbreakingly honest meditation on memory, identity, and aging—an elderly woman descending into dementia embarks on a desperate quest to find the best friend she believes has disappeared, and her search for the truth will go back decades and have shattering consequences.Maud, an aging grandmother, is slowly losing her memory—and her grip on everyday life. Yet she refuses to forget her best friend Elizabeth, whom she is convinced is missing and in terrible danger.But no one will listen to Maud—not her frustrated daughter, Helen, not her caretakers, not the police, and especially not Elizabeth’s mercurial son, Peter. Armed with handwritten notes she leaves for herself and an overwhelming feeling that Elizabeth needs her help, Maud resolves to discover the truth and save her beloved friend.This singular obsession forms a cornerstone of Maud’s rapidly dissolving present. But the clues she discovers seem only to lead her deeper into her past, to another unsolved disappearance: her sister, Sukey, who vanished shortly after World War II.As vivid memories of a tragedy that occurred more fifty years ago come flooding back, Maud discovers new momentum in her search for her friend. Could the mystery of Sukey’s disappearance hold the key to finding Elizabeth? less...
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    Snow in May: Stories by Kseniya Melnik
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    Amazon Says: Recommended by The New Yorker, The New York Public Library, Alan Cheuse of NPR, Grantland • Shortlisted for the 2014 International Dylan Thomas Prize • Longlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story AwardA “ruminative…lovely…accomplished” (The New York Times Book Review) and “touching” (The Seattle Times) debut collection of stories that “sparkles with the brilliance and charm of Chekhov.” (Simon Van Booy, award-winning author of Love Begins in Winter and The Illusion of Separateness)Kseniya Melnik's Snow in May introduces a cast of characters bound by their relationship to the port town of Magadan in Russia's Far East, a former gateway for prisoners assigned to Stalin’s forced-labor camps. Comprised of a surprising mix of newly minted professionals, ex-prisoners, intellectuals, musicians, and faithful Party workers, the community is vibrant and resilient and life in Magadan thrives even under the cover of near-perpetual snow. By blending history and fable, each of Melnik's stories transports us somewhere completely new: a married Magadan woman considers a proposition from an Italian footballer in '70s Moscow; an ailing young girl visits a witch doctor’s house where nothing is as it seems; a middle-aged dance teacher is entranced by a new student’s raw talent; a former Soviet boss tells his granddaughter the story of a thorny friendship; and a woman in 1958 jumps into a marriage with an army officer far too soon.Weaving in and out of the last half of the twentieth century, Snow in May is an inventive, gorgeously rendered, and touching portrait of lives lived on the periphery where, despite their isolation—and perhaps because of it—the most seemingly insignificant moments can be beautiful, haunting, and effervescent. less...
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    Amazon Says: From one of Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists, a stunning novel illuminating Somalia’s tragic civil war It is 1987 and Hargeisa waits. Whispers of revolution trav more...
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    The Farm by Tom Rob Smith
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    Amazon Says: Winner, Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction, 2014 Winner, Desmond Elliott Prize, 2014 Winner, Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year, 2014 Winner, Goldsmiths Prize, 2013 Finalis more...
    Amazon Says: Winner, Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction, 2014 Winner, Desmond Elliott Prize, 2014 Winner, Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year, 2014 Winner, Goldsmiths Prize, 2013 Finalist for the Folio Prize Shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize NPR's Best Books of 2014 The New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Books of 2014 #3 on Time Out New York's 10 best books of 2014 Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, and Library Journal's Best Books of 2014 Boston Globe Best Fiction of 2014 Chicago Tribune Printers Row Journal Best Books of 2014 Star Tribune Best Fiction of 2014 Electric Literature 25 Best Novels of 2014 Largehearted Boy Favorite Novels of 2014 "Eimear McBride is a writer of remarkable power and originality."—The Times Literary Supplement "An instant classic."—The Guardian "It's hard to imagine another narrative that would justify this way of telling, but perhaps McBride can build another style from scratch for another style of story. That's a project for another day, when this little book is famous."—London Review of Books "A Girl is a Half-formed Thing is simply a brilliant book—entirely emotionally raw and at the same time technically astounding. Her prose is as haunting and moving as music, and the love story at the heart of the novel—between a sister and brother—as true and wrenching as any in literature. This is a book about everything: family, faith, sex, home, transcendence, violence, and love. I can't recommend it highly enough."—Elizabeth McCracken "McBride’s A Girl is a Half-formed Thing is a game-changer, a disruptor, a grenade of a novel, and we all agreed this had to win."—Isabel Berwick "My discovery of the year was Eimear McBride's debut novel A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing."—Eleanor Catton Eimear McBride's acclaimed debut tells the story of a young woman's relationship with her brother, and the long shadow cast by his childhood brain tumor, touching on everything from family violence to sexuality and the personal struggle to remain intact in times of intense trauma. Eimear McBride was born in 1976 and grew up in Ireland. At twenty-seven she wrote A Girl is a Half-formed Thing and spent the next nine years trying to have it published. less...
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