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Connected: the surprising power of our social networks and how they shape our lives
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Giving Ourselves Away: Internet Privacy & You

Facebook recently changed privacy settings for teenagers so that they may change their settings to share their posts to the public.

Teenagers' Facebook accounts will share only within their network by default, but this change in privacy options could have massive consequences down the line. Teenage performers and entrepreneurs will have an easier time of marketing themselves, but so will teens sharing reckless behavior.

We have many books and materials about issues of privacy and exposure in an increasingly digital world. How much loss of privacy can be attributed to owners of massive websites and services, and how much to the users of those sites? Where does the buck truly stop? (This is a good time to remind readers that Richland Library protects the privacy of its customers.)

The more informed we are about who's watching us online, the better we can protect ourselves.


Amazon Says: Ten years in the making and culled from 5000 hours of footage, WE LIVE IN PUBLIC reveals the effect the web is having on our society, as seen through the eyes of the greatest more...
Amazon Says: Ten years in the making and culled from 5000 hours of footage, WE LIVE IN PUBLIC reveals the effect the web is having on our society, as seen through the eyes of the greatest Internet pioneer you ve never heard of, artist, futurist and visionary Josh Harris. Award-winning director Ondi Timoner (DIG! which also won the Sundance Grand Jury Prize in 2004 making Timoner the only director to win that prestigious award twice) documented his tumultuous life for more than a decade to create a riveting, cautionary tale of what to expect as the virtual world inevitably takes control of our lives. Harris, often called the Warhol of the Web, founded Pseudo.com, the first Internet television network during the infamous dot-com boom of the 1990s. He also curated and funded the ground breaking project, Quiet, in an underground bunker in NYC where over 100 people lived together on camera for 30 days at the turn of the millennium. With Quiet, Harris proved how we willingly trade our privacy for the connection and recognition we all deeply desire, but with every technological advancement such as MySpace, Facebook and Twitter, becomes more elusive. Through his experiments, including a six-month stint living with his girlfriend under 24-hour electronic surveillance which led to his mental collapse, Harris demonstrated the price we pay for living in public. less...
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Amazon Says: The Internet has been romanticized as a zone of freedom. The alluring combination of sophisticated technology with low barriers to entry and instantaneous outreach to million more...
Amazon Says: The Internet has been romanticized as a zone of freedom. The alluring combination of sophisticated technology with low barriers to entry and instantaneous outreach to millions of users has mesmerized libertarians and communitarians alike. Lawmakers have joined the celebration, passing the Communications Decency Act, which enables Internet Service Providers to allow unregulated discourse without danger of liability, all in the name of enhancing freedom of speech. But an unregulated Internet is a breeding ground for offensive conduct. At last we have a book that begins to focus on abuses made possible by anonymity, freedom from liability, and lack of oversight. The distinguished scholars assembled in this volume, drawn from law and philosophy, connect the absence of legal oversight with harassment and discrimination. Questioning the simplistic notion that abusive speech and mobocracy are the inevitable outcomes of new technology, they argue that current misuse is the outgrowth of social, technological, and legal choices. Seeing this clearly will help us to be better informed about our options. In a field still dominated by a frontier perspective, this book has the potential to be a real game changer. Armed with example after example of harassment in Internet chat rooms and forums, the authors detail some of the vile and hateful speech that the current combination of law and technology has bred. The facts are then treated to analysis and policy prescriptions. Read this book and you will never again see the Internet through rose-colored glasses. less...
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Amazon Says: Managing Your Digital Footprint By Robert Grayson With the explosion of communication devices tied to the Internet, teens need guidance in healthy online participation more t more...
Amazon Says: Managing Your Digital Footprint By Robert Grayson With the explosion of communication devices tied to the Internet, teens need guidance in healthy online participation more than ever. One key requirement for digital literacy is learning to manage one's "digital footprint." This book raises readers' awareness of the array of information they can leave behind when using technology and the Web. The book empowers teens to behave in ways that protect their physical and psychological health; identities and property; and social and professional reputations well into the future. less...
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Amazon Says: A leading specialist on social networks writes a shocking exposé of the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web to protect us. more...
Amazon Says: A leading specialist on social networks writes a shocking exposé of the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web to protect us. Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time. Over a half a billion people are on Facebook alone. If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest nation in the world. But while that nation appears to be a comforting small town in which we can share photos of friends and quaint bits of trivia about our lives, it is actually a lawless battle zone—a frontier with all the hidden and unpredictable dangers of any previously unexplored place. Social networks offer freedom. An ordinary individual can be a reporter, alerting the world to breaking news of a natural disaster or a political crisis. A layperson can be a scientist, participating in a crowd-sourced research project. Or an investigator, helping cops solve a crime. But as we work and chat and date (and sometimes even have sex) over the web, traditional rights may be slipping away. Colleges and employers routinely reject applicants because of information found on social networks. Cops use photos from people’s profiles to charge them with crimes—or argue for harsher sentences. Robbers use postings about vacations to figure out when to break into homes. At one school, officials used cameras on students’ laptops to spy on them in their bedrooms. The same power of information that can topple governments can also topple a person’s career, marriage, or future. What Andrews proposes is a Constitution for the web, to extend our rights to this wild new frontier. This vitally important book will generate a storm of attention. less...
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The Googlization of Everything: by Siva Vaidhyanathan
Amazon Says: In the beginning, the World Wide Web was exciting and open to the point of anarchy, a vast and intimidating repository of unindexed confusion. Into this creative chaos came Go more...
Amazon Says: In the beginning, the World Wide Web was exciting and open to the point of anarchy, a vast and intimidating repository of unindexed confusion. Into this creative chaos came Google with its dazzling mission--"To organize the world's information and make it universally accessible"--and its much-quoted motto, "Don't be Evil." In this provocative book, Siva Vaidhyanathan examines the ways we have used and embraced Google--and the growing resistance to its expansion across the globe. He exposes the dark side of our Google fantasies, raising red flags about issues of intellectual property and the much-touted Google Book Search. He assesses Google's global impact, particularly in China, and explains the insidious effect of Googlization on the way we think. Finally, Vaidhyanathan proposes the construction of an Internet ecosystem designed to benefit the whole world and keep one brilliant and powerful company from falling into the "evil" it pledged to avoid. less...
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Amazon Says: So you’ve heard about Facebook—maybe your friends have invited you to join or it’s the hot topic around the water cooler—but you’re not sure what it’s all about. R more...
Amazon Says: So you’ve heard about Facebook—maybe your friends have invited you to join or it’s the hot topic around the water cooler—but you’re not sure what it’s all about. Relax and join in. There are more than 110 million members of Facebook these days, and adults are the fastest-growing segment of users. And it’s about more than just kid stuff; Facebook can actually be a good business tool as well as a great way to promote creative projects. In Facebook Me! Dave Awl shows you around the newly redesigned Facebook and helps you take full advantage of all it has to offer, while helping you avoid some of its pitfalls. • Find out what you can do on Facebook, and what it can do for you. Reconnect with old friends and make new ones, let your friends know what you’re up to, send greetings, share photos or video, or just goof around with applications like SuperPoke. • Learn Facebook etiquette: how and why to friend someone, how to socialize politely, and whether to friend your boss. • Publicize your projects, business, or causes: Post to your Wall, set up a Page, put up a Marketplace listing, or invite friends to Events. Look for the official Facebook Me! Group on Facebook, to connect with the author and other readers of this book. less...
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Amazon Says: Updated with a new Afterword“The revolution will be Twittered!” declared journalist Andrew Sullivan after protests erupted in Iran. But as journalist and social com more...
Amazon Says: Updated with a new Afterword“The revolution will be Twittered!” declared journalist Andrew Sullivan after protests erupted in Iran. But as journalist and social commentator Evgeny Morozov argues in The Net Delusion, the Internet is a tool that both revolutionaries and authoritarian governments can use. For all of the talk in the West about the power of the Internet to democratize societies, regimes in Iran and China are as stable and repressive as ever. Social media sites have been used there to entrench dictators and threaten dissidents, making it harder—not easier—to promote democracy.Marshalling a compelling set of case studies, The Net Delusion shows why the cyber-utopian stance that the Internet is inherently liberating is wrong, and how ambitious and seemingly noble initiatives like the promotion of “Internet freedom” are misguided and, on occasion, harmful. less...
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Amazon Says: Ninety-five percent of American kids have Internet access by age 11; the average number of texts a teenager sends each month is well over 3,000. More families report that tech more...
Amazon Says: Ninety-five percent of American kids have Internet access by age 11; the average number of texts a teenager sends each month is well over 3,000. More families report that technology makes life with children more challenging, not less, as parents today struggle with questions previous generations never faced: Is my thirteen-year-old responsible enough for a Facebook page? What will happen if I give my nine year-old a cell phone? In The Parent App, Lynn Schofield Clark provides what families have been sorely lacking: smart, sensitive, and effective strategies for coping with the dilemmas of digital and mobile media in modern life. Clark set about interviewing scores of mothers and fathers, identifying not only their various approaches, but how they differ according to family income. Parents in upper-income families encourage their children to use media to enhance their education and self-development and to avoid use that might distract them from goals of high achievement. Lower income families, in contrast, encourage the use of digital and mobile media in ways that are respectful, compliant toward parents, and family-focused. Each approach has its own benefits and drawbacks, and whatever the parenting style or economic bracket, parents experience anxiety about how to manage new technology. With the understanding of a parent of teens and the rigor of a social scientist, Clark tackles a host of issues, such as family communication, online predators, cyber bullying, sexting, gamer drop-outs, helicopter parenting, technological monitoring, the effectiveness of strict controls, and much more. The Parent App is more than an advice manual. As Clark admits, technology changes too rapidly for that. Rather, she puts parenting in context, exploring the meaning of media challenges and the consequences of our responses-for our lives as family members and as members of society. less...
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