Skip to content

Hey Kids, Let's Plant a Tree!

The sights and sounds of spring are in the air, and it is the perfect time to think about improving the world around us by planting a tree. Share the following stories with your family to teach everyone how important trees can be.

Gert is a dirt lover. She even eats it! But no one could predict how far this child's need for dirt will take her in Dirty Gert by Ted Arnold, the author of the popular Fly Guy series.

When Caroline saves a wildflower in her family's new, suburban lawn from the mower, she begins to notice both the beauty of and the necessity for natural habitats for the local wildlife. To become inspired yourself, read On Meadowview Street by Henry Cole.

Everyone benefits from trees! Take a look at Diane Muldrow's poetic We Planted a Tree to learn why.

Young Emmy learns the necessity of patience when she requests a mimosa tree for her birthday in A Tree for Emmy by Mary Ann Rodman.

And finally, The Mangrove Tree by Susan Roth and Cindy Trumbore tells us the true story of how the efforts of Dr. Gordon Sato have helped the citizens of Hargigo, Eritria improve the quality of life for everyone in their town by planting mangrove trees in the salty water at the edge of the Red Sea.


Dirty Gert by Tedd Arnold
Amazon Says: Gert loves dirt. She rolls in it, digs in it, even tastes it. Then one day while making mud pies in the rain, Gert becomes reorganized: she grows branches, leaves and roots. G more...
Amazon Says: Gert loves dirt. She rolls in it, digs in it, even tastes it. Then one day while making mud pies in the rain, Gert becomes reorganized: she grows branches, leaves and roots. Gert is delighted . . . until camera crews televise her, botanists analyze her, and Hollywood tries to immortalize her. The child is traumatized! But Mom and Dad know what to do to protect their offbeat plant-child. They shoo away the intruders. Told in rhythm and rhyme and illustrated with Tedd Arnold's offbeat yet endearing characters, this story is a humorous testament to individuality and unconditional love. less...
Amazon

On Meadowview Street by Henry Cole
Amazon Says: Caroline lives on Meadowview Street. But where's the meadow? Where's the view? There's nothing growing in her front yard except grass. Then she spots a flower and a butterfly more...
Amazon Says: Caroline lives on Meadowview Street. But where's the meadow? Where's the view? There's nothing growing in her front yard except grass. Then she spots a flower and a butterfly and a bird and Caroline realizes that with her help, maybe Meadowview Street can have a meadow after all. less...
Amazon

We Planted a Tree by Diane Muldrow
Amazon Says: We planted a tree and it grew up, While it reached for the sky and the sun. . . . In this simple poem illustrated by award winner Bob Staake, two young families in two very more...
Amazon Says: We planted a tree and it grew up, While it reached for the sky and the sun. . . . In this simple poem illustrated by award winner Bob Staake, two young families in two very different parts of the world plant a tree. As the trees flourish, so do the families . . . while trees all over the world help clean the air, enrich the soil, and give fruit and shade. With a nod to Kenya’s successful Green Belt Movement, Diane Muldrow’s elegant text celebrates the life and hope that every tree—from Paris to Brooklyn to Tokyo—brings to our planet. Perfect for young readers! less...
Amazon

A Tree for Emmy by Mary Ann Rodman
Amazon Says: Emmy loves trees. She loves oak trees with acorns. She loves pine trees with cones, and willow trees with swishy branches. But best of all, Emmy loves the mimosa tree that gro more...
Amazon Says: Emmy loves trees. She loves oak trees with acorns. She loves pine trees with cones, and willow trees with swishy branches. But best of all, Emmy loves the mimosa tree that grows in her grandmother s pasture. Emmy swings on its branches, plays with its fuzzy pink blossoms, and rattles its seedpods like maracas. But when Emmy decides she wants a mimosa tree of her own for her birthday, she is dismayed to find that many grown-ups do not share her enthusiasm. Garden stores only sell ornamental trees like plum or pear or tulip trees. Emmy is crushed until she discovers that the answer to her problem is growing right before her eyes! This joyful story of a spirited young girl s steadfast affection for a wild mimosa tree will appeal to all who cherish a special dream, and will help readers appreciate the natural world around them. Illustrator Tatjana Mai-Wyss s whimsical watercolor and collage illustrations capture Emmy s exuberant personality and the story s hopeful ending. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: For a long time, the people of Hargigo, a village in the tiny African country of Eritrea, were living without enough food for themselves and their animals. The families were h more...
Amazon Says: For a long time, the people of Hargigo, a village in the tiny African country of Eritrea, were living without enough food for themselves and their animals. The families were hungry, and their goats and sheep were hungry too. Then along came a scientist, Dr. Gordon Sato, who helped change their lives for the better. And it all started with some special trees.These are the trees,Mangrove trees,That were planted by the sea.With alternating verse and prose passages, The Mangrove Tree invites readers to discover how Dr. Sato's mangrove tree-planting project transformed an impoverished village into a self-sufficient community. This fascinating story is a celebration of creativity, hard work—and all those mangrove trees that were planted by the sea! less...
Amazon
Print

Comment about this page...