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South Carolina and The Civil War: 150 Years Later

South Carolina’s rich history never ceases to amaze me. Although I’m not a native South Carolinian, I am always eager to learn more about South Carolina’s prominent figures and the events that have greatly influenced the future of this country.

Researching South Carolina’s connection to the Civil War has been of particular interest to me recently because 2011 marks 150 years since the war commenced at Fort Sumter. Not only did South Carolina play a significant role in the beginning of the war but Sherman’s March through South Carolina is well known as one of the events that led to the end of the war.

More recently, I learned that General Sherman met with leaders of the African American community to discuss the state of the freedmen and women at the time.  James Lynch, a young A.M.E. missionary who was a leader in the process of re-entering the African Church to South Carolina, was amongst those who attended that meeting with General Sherman on January 12, 1865.

This led me to want to know more about James Lynch. Subsequently, I learned that he served as editor of The Christian Recorder, an African American newspaper that is available through one of the library’s newest databases, Accessible Archives. This is a wonderful addition to the library’s collection as it provides even easier access to the past. Listed below are other resources on South Carolina and the Civil War:

  • The Negro's Civil War: How American Blacks Felt and Acted During the War of the Union
  • Historic Photos of South Carolina
  • Merchant of Terror: General Sherman and Total War

Crystal J. Says: Historic Photos of South Carolina
Amazon Says: Native South Carolinian and historian Benjamin Brawley once wrote, “The little triangle on the map known as South Carolina represents a portion of our country whose influence more...
Amazon Says: Native South Carolinian and historian Benjamin Brawley once wrote, “The little triangle on the map known as South Carolina represents a portion of our country whose influence has been incalculable.” Always fiercely independent, South Carolina has been a republic twice in its history: once prior to the Revolutionary War, and second prior to the War Between the States. From the immense wealth of the Colonial period to the debilitating poverty of Reconstruction and the early twentieth century, South Carolina’s history has always been compelling. One South Carolinian offered, “We had our love of family, our love of history, our resistance to change that was both for and against us.” Blessed by the attention of photographers for more than 150 years, South Carolina and its remarkable past is seen through this fascinating collection of photographs, which brings the stories of the people and history of the Palmetto State to life. Join historian Doug Bostick as he chronicles the history of his home state since 1860, viewed through the lens of a camera. less...
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