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She played well with others

Late Tuesday night Columbia lost a good friend, jazz icon Marian McPartland. McPartland's radio show, Piano Jazz, was produced by Columbia native, Shari Hutchinson for South Carolina Public Radio. Thanks to that connection Columbia was host to several memorable McPartland events including a concert with jazz legend Dave Brubeck. Last year the Walker Local and Family History Center featured an exhibit about Hutchinson and her work with Marian and we hosted a reading from Paul DeBarros who recently wrote Marian's biography, Shall We Play That One Together. Marian was radio's most gracious hostess and we are so fortunate to have the legacy of her recordings for many future generations.


Amazon Says: In a world dominated by men, Marian McPartland distinguished herself as one of the greatest jazz pianists of her ageBorn in the UK as Margaret Marian Turner, Marian McPartlan more...
Amazon Says: In a world dominated by men, Marian McPartland distinguished herself as one of the greatest jazz pianists of her ageBorn in the UK as Margaret Marian Turner, Marian McPartland learned to play classical piano, but was passionately attracted to the rhythms of American jazz. Entertaining troops in WWII Europe, she met her future husband, Jimmy McPartland, a cocky young trumpet player who was the protege of the great Bix Beiderbecke. They were married and, together, they made jazz history. At first, Marian played second fiddle to Jimmy in Chicago, but when they moved to New York, Marian and her trio took up residence at the famous Hickory House where she thrilled the crowds from her perch on a stage in the middle of large oval bar. From there she went on to triumphs at places like the Montreaux Jazz Festival.  Possibly, her greatest accomplishment was the creation of NPR's long-running show Piano Jazz. More than the life story of one of our greatest artists, Shall We Play That One Together? by Paul de Barros chronicles an age when jazz was a vital art form. Just as inviting as Marian's signature question on Piano Jazz, Shall We Play That One Together? is an invitation to readers everywhere to listen to the score of a bygone age. less...
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Amazon Says: "Their conversations range far beyond the biographical—to their feelings, motivations, musical approaches, and attitudes. These women were obviously comfortable with their q more...
Amazon Says: "Their conversations range far beyond the biographical—to their feelings, motivations, musical approaches, and attitudes. These women were obviously comfortable with their questioners. [Enstice and Stockhouse] came prepared, having delved deeply into the music and history of each, bringing them closer to the essence of each musician." —from the Preface by Cobi Narita and Paul Ash"Jazzwomen includes many artists who are not covered in earlier books and also reveals new information about artists who are. In addition, the interview format used in Jazzwomen provides the reader with each artist’s own words, permeated with a warmth and immediacy not typically found in author narratives. Jazzwomen is a much-needed book." —David N. Baker, Distinguished Professor of Music and Chairman, Jazz Department, Indiana University School of Music; and Artistic and Musical Director, Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks OrchestraBetween 1995 and 2000, Wayne Enstice and Janis Stockhouse interviewed dozens of women jazz instrumentalists and vocalists. Jazzwomen collects 21 of the most fascinating interviews. The participants discuss everything—their personal lives, musical training and inspirations, recordings, relationships with other musicians, the music industry, sexism on the bandstand—and often make candid and revealing statements. At the end of each interview is a recommended discography compiled by the authors.Every jazz listener, musician, teacher, and student will be captivated by interviews with Marian McPartland, Regina Carter, Abbey Lincoln, Cassandra Wilson, Diana Krall, and their peers. Includes a sampler CD with complete works by several of the artists, including Jane Ira Bloom and Ingrid Jensen. less...
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