Skip to content

Today in History with a Twist

America Under Attack!

     War came to America's shores today (1942) when a Japanese floatplane droped incendiary bombs on Oregon.  It was an attempt to start forest fires that could possibly hurt the American war effort.  It was also meant to demoralize the civilian population when they realized they could come under attack.  Thank God John Belushi was there to stop them!

     Maybe they could comfort themselves with their Teddy Bears.  Today is Teddy Bear Day.  It is the perfect opportunity to celebrate our most loyal childhood companions.  The teddy bear dates back to the early 1900s and its history is closely linked to an American president.  In November 1902, President Theodore (Teddy) Roosevelt attended a bear hunt in Mississippi.  The other members of the hunting party captured a young bear, tied it to a tree, and offered the shot to the president.  When news spread that Roosevelt refused to kill the bear, a political cartoonist named Clifford Berryman depicted the president with the bear in a cartoon titled, “Drawing the Line in Mississippi.”  In the first printing the cartoon bear was a full-grown animal, but it was later redrawn as a cuddly cub.  The story and cartoon became famous, toy makers were inspired to create “Teddy’s Bear,” and by 1906 the teddy bear craze was in full swing!  Today, teddy bears are a staple in any young child's life.  Celebrate this American icon and make sure the kids in your life have a huggable teddy bear today! (Punchbowl.com)

     There was a battle in Hawaii but it was not an invasion.  A Filipino sugar worker's strike against the Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association in Hanapepe, Kauai, Hawaii has ended in disaster (1924).  When striking workers took two strike breaking workers hostage police moved in to rescue them.  A fire fight ensued resulting in 16 striking workers being killed as were 4 policemen.  You can probably figure out why sugar prices are still relatively low.

      President Washington was honored today (1791) when the new capital was named after him - Washington, D.C.  Don't remember the D.C. in his name.

     We go underground for the next story (1972).   In Kentucky's Mammoth Cave National Park, a Cave Research Foundation exploration and mapping team has discovered a link between the Mammoth and Flint Ridge cave systems, making it the longest known cave passageway in the world.   This will give us an edge in the 'mine shaft gap'. 

     Disaster for Rome in Germania (9).  Former Roman protege' the German leader Arminius turned on his former allies uniting six Germanic tribes who ambushed and annihilated three Roman legions of Publius Quinctilius Varus in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest.  Roman Legions never lost an Eagle (standard) in combat before but lost three in this battle.  Rome is having second thoughts about expanding into Germania.  Can't trust those sneaky Germans.

     Croatian forces suffered a similar defeat at the hands of the Ottomans (1493) at the Battle of Krbava field.  Between 7 and 10 thousand Croats died in the battle including many Nobles.  Several thousand more were taken prisoner.  Only an alliance of Croats, Serbs and Bosnians will be able to stop the invasion by the Ottoman Empire.  Like that will ever happen.

Today we celebrate the birthdays of:

      1585 - Cardinal Richelieu - French clergyman and statesman (d. 1642) - He obviously didn't believe in separation of Church and State.

     1754 - William Bligh - English admiral and statesmen, 4th Governor of New South Wales (d. 1817) - Faired better than Mr Christian.

     1828 - Leo Tolstoy - Russian author (d. 1910) - Anybody out there finish 'War and Peace'?

 

To learn more aboyut the above topics check the following books from the Library's collection:


Amazon Says: If you toured Mammoth Cave in Kentucky around the year 1838, you would have been led by candlelight through miles of dark winding tunnels, to the edge of a terrifying botto more...
Amazon Says: If you toured Mammoth Cave in Kentucky around the year 1838, you would have been led by candlelight through miles of dark winding tunnels, to the edge of a terrifying bottomless pit, and curiously, a church built underground. Your tour guide would have been seventeen-year-old Stephen Bishop, an African American, and a slave. Bishop had a job he found truly thrilling--exploring and recording every inch of his exciting adventures at Mammoth Cave and escorting tourists to show them his discoveries. Luckily, by being so successful in this job, Bishop was able to avoid the grueling labor most slaves endured. Full of adventure and fascinating details about cave exploration Journey to the Bottomless Pit is the first book for young readers ever written about Stephen Bishop. Through Stephen Bishop's story, author Betsy Mitchell takes readers on a tour unlike anything they've experienced. less...
Amazon

Amazon Says: More than two centuries have passed since Master's Mate Fletcher Christian mutinied against Lieutenant Bligh on a small, armed transport vessel called Bounty. Why the details more...
Amazon Says: More than two centuries have passed since Master's Mate Fletcher Christian mutinied against Lieutenant Bligh on a small, armed transport vessel called Bounty. Why the details of this obscure adventure at the end of the world remain vivid and enthralling is as intriguing as the truth behind the legend. In giving the Bounty mutiny its historical due, Caroline Alexander has chosen to frame her narrative by focusing on the court-martial of the ten mutineers who were captured in Tahiti and brought to justice in England. This fresh perspective wonderfully revivifies the entire saga, and the salty, colorful language of the captured men themselves conjures the events of that April morning in 1789, when Christian's breakdown impelled every man on a fateful course: Bligh and his loyalists on the historic open boat voyage that revealed him to be one of history's great navigators; Christian on his restless exile; and the captured mutineers toward their day in court. As the book unfolds, each figure emerges as a full-blown character caught up in a drama that may well end on the gallows. And as Alexander shows, it was in a desperate fight to escape hanging that one of the accused defendants deliberately spun the mutiny into the myth we know today-of the tyrannical Lieutenant Bligh of the Bounty. Ultimately, Alexander concludes that the Bounty mutiny was sparked by that most unpredictable, combustible, and human of situations-the chemistry between strong personalities living in close quarters. Her account of the voyage, the trial, and the surprising fates of Bligh, Christian, and the mutineers is an epic of ambition, passion, pride, and duty at the dawn of the Romantic era. less...
Amazon
Print

Comment about this page...