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March, Book Three, by John Lewis & Andrew Aydin ; art by Nate Powell.

YALSA's Young Adult Nonfiction Winner + Finalists, 2017

The Young Adult Library Services Association, in association with the American Library Association, announced its winner and finalists for the Award for Excellence in Young Adult Nonfiction

The selections are as follows:

Winner

March: Book Three by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell

Finalists

Hillary Rodham Clinton:  A Woman Living History by Karen Blumenthal

In the Shadow of Liberty:  The Hidden History of Slavery, Four Presidents, and Five Black Lives by Kenneth C. Davis

Samurai Rising:  The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune by Pamela S. Turner

This Land is Our Land:  A History of American Immigration by Linda Barrett Osborne

The complete list of nominees for 2017 can be found here


March: Book Three by John Lewis
Amazon Says: 2016 National Book Award Winner for Young People's Literature2017 Printz Award Winner2017 Coretta Scott King Author Award Winner2017 Sibert Medal Winne more...
Amazon Says: 2016 National Book Award Winner for Young People's Literature2017 Printz Award Winner2017 Coretta Scott King Author Award Winner2017 Sibert Medal Winner2017 YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction Winner2017 Walter Award Winner"One of the Best Books of 2016" - Publishers WeeklyWelcome to the stunning conclusion of the award-winning and best-selling MARCH trilogy. Congressman John Lewis, an American icon and one ofthe key figures of the civil rights movement, joins co-writer Andrew Aydin and artist Nate Powell to bring the lessons of history to vivid life for a new generation, urgently relevant for today's world.By the fall of 1963, the Civil Rights Movement has penetrated deep into the American consciousness, and as chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, John Lewis is guiding the tip of the spear. Through relentless direct action, SNCC continues to force the nation to confront its own blatant injustice, but for every step forward, the danger grows more intense: Jim Crow strikes back through legal tricks, intimidation, violence, and death. The only hope for lasting change is to give voice to the millions of Americans silenced by voter suppression: "One Man, One Vote." To carry out their nonviolent revolution, Lewis and an army of young activists launch a series of innovative campaigns, including the Freedom Vote, Mississippi Freedom Summer, and an all-out battle for the soul of the Democratic Party waged live on national television.With these new struggles come new allies, new opponents, and an unpredictable new president who might be both at once. But fractures within the movement are deepening ... even as 25-year-old John Lewis prepares to risk everything in a historic showdown high above the Alabama river, in a town called Selma. less...
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Amazon Says: As a young girl, Hillary Diane Rodham’s parents told her she could be whatever she wanted--as long as she was willing to work for it. Hillary took those words and ran. In a more...
Amazon Says: As a young girl, Hillary Diane Rodham’s parents told her she could be whatever she wanted--as long as she was willing to work for it. Hillary took those words and ran. In a life on the front row of modern American history, she has always stood out--whether she was a teen campaigning for the 1964 Republican presidential candidate, winning recognition in Life magazine for her pointed words as the first student commencement speaker at Wellesley College, or working on the Richard Nixon impeachment case as a newly minted lawyer.For all her accomplishments, scrutiny and scandal have followed this complex woman since she stepped into the public eye―from her role as First Lady of Arkansas to First Lady of the United States to becoming the first female U.S. senator from New York to U.S. secretary of state. Despite intense criticism, Hillary has remained committed to public service and dedicated to health-care reform, children's issues, and women’s rights. Now, she aspires to a bigger role: her nation's first woman president.In Hillary Rodham Clinton: A Woman Living History, critically acclaimed author Karen Blumenthal gives us an intimate and unflinching look at the public and personal life of Hillary Rodham Clinton. Illustrated throughout with black-and-white photographs and political cartoons, this is a must-have biography about a woman who has fascinated--and divided--the public, who continues to push boundaries, and who isn’t afraid to reach for one more goal."After decades in the public eye, Hillary Rodham Clinton is still an enigma, as Blumenthal (Tommy: The Gun That Changed America) emphasizes in this compelling portrait of the former U.S. Senator and Secretary of State’s journey from budding activist to presidential aspirant." ―Publishers Weekly, starred review less...
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Amazon Says: Minamoto Yoshitsune should not have been a samurai. But his story is legend in this real-life saga. This epic warrior tale reads like a novel, but this is the true story of more...
Amazon Says: Minamoto Yoshitsune should not have been a samurai. But his story is legend in this real-life saga. This epic warrior tale reads like a novel, but this is the true story of the greatest samurai in Japanese history. When Yoshitsune was just a baby, his father went to war with a rival samurai family—and lost. His father was killed, his mother captured, and his surviving half-brother banished. Yoshitsune was sent away to live in a monastery. Skinny, small, and unskilled in the warrior arts, he nevertheless escaped and learned the ways of the samurai. When the time came for the Minamoto clan to rise up against their enemies, Yoshitsune answered the call. His daring feats and impossible bravery earned him immortality. less...
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Amazon Says: A 2017 YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction finalist! American attitudes toward immigrants are paradoxical. On the one hand, we see our country as a haven for the more...
Amazon Says: A 2017 YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction finalist! American attitudes toward immigrants are paradoxical. On the one hand, we see our country as a haven for the poor and oppressed; anyone, no matter his or her background, can find freedom here and achieve the “American Dream.” On the other hand, depending on prevailing economic conditions, fluctuating feelings about race and ethnicity, and fear of foreign political and labor agitation, we set boundaries and restrictions on who may come to this country and whether they may stay as citizens. This book explores the way government policy and popular responses to immigrant groups evolved throughout U.S. history, particularly between 1800 and 1965. The book concludes with a summary of events up to contemporary times, as immigration again becomes a hot-button issue. Includes an author’s note, bibliography, and index.   less...
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